Authenticity – Be Yourself

February 21, 2020

Carole Kanchier, PhD

Authenticity – Be Yourself

Questers Dare to Change Shows How

                https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

The word, “authenticity” comes from the Greek root authentikos, meaning “original, genuine, principal.” Authentic people are genuine, self actualizing and have a sense of purpose. Along with fearless passion and courage, they possess strong mental discipline.

Authenticity does not come from title, social stature, or wealth, but rather from how we live. That is, how we go about pursuing our purpose and making a contribution in our own unique way. Authentic people prevail in changing times because they are in harmony with the energy of the universe. Most Questers, described in Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, are authentic: www.questersdaretochange.com.

How authentic are you?

  • Check qualities you possess.
  • – Try to perform daily activities in unique ways
  • – Work hard
  • – Share honest opinions
  • – Enjoy being alone
  • – Self aware
  • – Curiou
  • – Love intellectual stimulation
  • – Respect others
  • – Enjoy inter personal relationships
  • – Seek new opportunities
  • – Exude vibrancy
  • – Care about environmental issues
  • – Live in the moment
  • Scoring: The more statements you checked, the more authentic you seem to be.

Fostering authenticity

To be authentic, you must understand who you are, who you want to become, and contributions you intend to make to make the world a better place.  Be self-guided, real!.

– Strengthen Quester traits. Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

– Build self esteem. Confidence gives you courage to set high expectations, to risk, to grow, to be authentic. Acknowledge your accomplishments. Prepare a list of positive achievements and personality characteristics. Post this where you can read it daily. Don’t change to please others or compare yourself to or compete with others.

Stretch yourself. Constantly push the envelope, raising standards. Challenge conventional beliefs and paths. Travel uncharted territories. Although this may invoke disappointments, accepting and growing through challenges enhances authenticity.

– Be in the moment. Engage yourself completely in the activity at hand.

– Maintain perspective. Time and distance can make mountains seem like molehills. Don’t let what happened yesterday affect what will happen tomorrow. Face each challenge with an open mind.  Look upon setbacks as one step toward growth and authenticity.

Take comfort in uncertainty.  This unchartered path evolves moment-by-moment.  Realize the path is the goal. Everything is workable.

– Focus on the positive. Look for and expect good things. Each time you catch yourself thinking something negative, replace it with a more positive thought.

– Strengthen resilience. Note what you’ve learned from traumatic experiences. Indicate how these have made you stronger, wiser, more authentic. Identify early cues that you’ve ignored, and what you’d now do differently.

– Bolster courage to risk. Review three successful risks taken. Note what made these successful. Identify perceived barriers for taking another risk, and explore ways to overcome them.

– Manage fear. Identify worrisome issues. Minimize these by researching relevant information and resources. Live in the present. Let go of “attachments.”

– Create a life in which you continue to grow and have choices. Make choices in harmony with your authentic self.  Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life shows how. http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Dr. Carole Kanchier, career and personal growth expert, is a registered psychologist, coach, speaker and author of  award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Dr. Kanchier offers coaching and speaking engagements on topics related to being the real you.

Contact  Carole Kanchier; carole@daretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

 

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SPRING – NEW CAREER BEGINNINGS

Questers Dare to Change Shows How to Revitalise Career

Spring is a time for renewal and rebirth and the signs of change are all around us. Flowers are blooming, the days are longer, brighter, warmer. We become more open to inviting changes into our lives.

Spring, a season of transformations, may be the time to dare yourself to make desired changes in your life career!

Based on ongoing research, the 7 edition of award winning, Questers Dare to Change, redefines career advancement and shows how to navigate lifelong career decisions.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Case studies of purposeful, growth oriented, Questers, quizzes, and guidelines show readers how to empower themselves to manage lifelong personal, career, and spiritual growth.

Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts/ and Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Individuals and organizations world wide benefit from Questers.  Questers Dare to Change answers many questions people have about lifelong decision making and growth.

* Are you a Quester? Check Quester traits with self-scoring quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

* Courage – A crucial skill in changing times

* Develop a lifelong master plan for career success

* Develop a winning mindset

* Understand how job dissatisfaction affects health and productivity

* Are you ready for a career shift?

* Overcome fear of failure

* Entry, mastery, and disengagement – Where are you?

* Find your truth – Complete self-scoring quizzes

… And so much more

Please request a complementary PDF version of Questers for review. Dr. Kanchier is available for consultations or speaking engagements. Sample articles/columns may be found: www.questersdaretochange.com/blog.

Many thanks for considering this invitation to share ongoing personal, career and spiritual growth.

Carole Kanchier, PhD carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and consulted with organizations world wide. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 Tips for Energizing Career

February 18, 2020

3 Tips for Energizing Career

Srengthen Quester traits. Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

– Overcome fear of failure. Attend to self talk. Keep log of negative things you say to self, say cancel, replace with positive thought.

– Explore desired career options within or outside your current organization then update skills to apply for job.

Review award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Carole Kanchier, to get additional tips for energizing career and managing lifelong career decision making. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

 

 

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EMBRACE CHANGE

February 18, 2020

EMBRACE #CHANGE

#QuestersDaretoChange Shows How

Spring is here, and many are re-examining life career goals.

Based on ongoing research, the 7 edition of award winning, Questers Dare to Change, redefines career advancement and shows how to navigate lifelong career decisions.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Case studies of purposeful, growth oriented, Questers, quizzes, and guidelines show readers how to empower themselves to manage lifelong personal, career, and spiritual growth.

Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts/ and Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Individuals and organizations world wide benefit from Questers.  Questers Dare to Change answers many questions adults have about lifelong decision making and growth.

* Are you a Quester? Check Quester traits with self-scoring quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

* Courage – A crucial skill in changing times

* Develop a lifelong master plan for career success

* Develop a winning mindset

* Understand how job dissatisfaction affects health and productivity

* Are you ready for a career shift?

* Overcome fear of failure

* Entry, mastery, and disengagement – Where are you?

* Find your truth – Complete self-scoring quizzes

… And so much more

Would you and your team ike to share topics addressed in Questers? I will be delighted to send a complementary PDF version of Questers for review, and be available for a consultation or speaking engagement at your request. Sample articles/columns are on my web site: www.questersdaretochange.com/blog.

Many thanks for sharing this invitation to help others change their life careers for the better.

Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and consulted with organizations world wide. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

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QUESTERS DARE TO CHANGE YOUR JOB AND LIFE by Carole Kanchier, PhD

 Informative, Thought-Provoking Interview Questions

  • Who are “Questers?” What are their characteristics? How can people find out if they have a “Q” type personality?
  • Check your Quester traits: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/
  • What can people do to develop Quester traits?
  • How does “the seven year itch” apply to career transitions – voluntary and involuntary?
  • How can a person turn a job loss into a victory? Survive in the current job market?
  • Many people are holding on to jobs they dislike/ Is this wise ?CCCC
  • How can people stay optimistic during job search? Is it realistic to dream big?
  • How can adults find work that matters to them and gives them a sense of meaning, purpose and direction?
  • Why did you write Dare to Change
  • You tell some very interesting stories about people who have made daring or unconventional career changes. Tell us about some.
  • You have an interesting chart of old and new career attitudes. Please share some old and new views.
  • What are some career transition Do’s and Don’ts?
  • Is it too late for a person of about 55 to change jobs or return to school?
  • What are some great strategies for landing a job?
  • What about people who want to change their lives but are afraid? How can they overcome the fear?
  • Can people who are not by nature risk-takers develop the will to risk?
  • What factors should people consider when making career decisions?
  • How can people tell if they’re ready for a career change?
  • What can a person do to present a dynamic image?
  • How can a job searcher stay motivated after getting numerous job rejections?
  • What does “retirement” mean to you?
  • What are some common excuses people make for not following their dreams?
  • How can people use intuition for career decision making or job search?

 

Contact: Carole Kanchier

www.questersdaretochange.com

carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What’s Your Purpose – Your Raison D’etre?

 Efforts and courage are not enough without purpose and direction.” ―John F. Kennedy

Having a sense of purpose and striving towards goals that enable you to express your purpose gives life meaning, direction and satisfaction. It not only contributes to health and longevity, but also enables you to succeed in uncertain times. If you’re in harmony with your purpose, you’re also in sync with the energy of the universe.

 Do you know your purpose?

Answer yes or no:

  1. Facing my daily tasks is very satisfying.
  2. I have clear career and life goals.
  3. My life has been worthless.
  4. I enjoy my close friends.
  5. I wouldn’t change my life drastically if I had six months to live.
  6. I have seriously thought of suicide.
  7. I see a reason to be here.
  8. My job and other activities give my life meaning.
  9. I have little meaning in my life.
  10. I spend my life doing what I “should” rather than what I want.
  11. My job reflects my purpose.
  12. I can state my purpose in a sentence.

Scoring: One for each “no” to statements 3, 6, 9 and 10; and one for each “yes” to others. The higher you score, the more involved you are in activities that give you a sense of meaning, direction and happiness. You’re honest with yourself, enjoy life, and are probably achieving desired goals. Your various work, leisure and other activities reflect a unity of purpose.

 Clarifying purpose

Identifying your purpose will take time particularly if you’re not used to looking inward.

– Identify what’s important to you. Clarify what success means to you. Don’t try to live up to others’ expectations and definitions of success.

– Consider how you’d change your life if you knew you had six months to live. If you would change jobs, return to school, complete a project, travel, then get on with it! What’s stopping you? Be honest.

– State what you’d do if you had billions. If you’re working at something that has no meaning just to pay bills, you’re making money more important than your sense of purpose. How could you make money doing what you really enjoy? Ross, a former accountant, earns lot of money making and selling his pottery.

–  Identify personality traits you would choose if you could begin life today. Would you be more assertive, caring or other?

– Describe yourself without using labels. Specify human qualities, for example: “I am smart, creative, and a loving partner.” If you resort to labels such as job history or marital status, you may view yourself as a statistic rather than a special human being.

– Adopt a cause. Discover ways in which you can get involved in community or other projects in which you believe — that enable you to express your purpose. Volunteer to help in a senior citizens’ home, volunteer to be big sister or bother, join a community fire fighting or group that fights for a cause in which you believe.

–  Identify major themes or patterns: 1) Proud accomplishments in any life area (social, work, school, civic); 2) What you want colleagues to say about you; 3) Absorbing childhood activities; 4) Recurring dream; 5) What you’d do if you couldn’t fail; 6) A prize you’d select (literary, athletic) for being the world’s best; 7) What you’d wear to a costume party; 8) People you admire and why; 9) Skills you want to use in your ideal job.

Write a “working” mission statement describing your purpose based on recurring themes. Discuss your themes with a partner. Brainstorm how your purpose can be expressed in various life components. For example, if your purpose is to help others, you could express it at work by being a helpful sales clerk. In family activities, you may express your purpose by being a loving aunt. Don’t allow age, lack of education, or physical disability stop you from expressing your purpose.

Dick’s purpose is communications. He’s been a successful magazine editor, author, broadcaster, photographer and evangelist. Charlene’s purpose is caring for animals. She’s made this into her business — caring for pets during their families’ vacations and waking dogs.

 Barbara loves woodworking and cabinet making so she developed a business that enables her to offer these services to her community. Roy‘s purpose is helping people. He says, “Volunteers are unpaid not because they are worthless, but because they are priceless.” Roy volunteers for varied projects that help needy children.

Purpose is a common denominator for success. Knowing your purpose will give you courage to do what you’ve always longed to do. It will be easier to risk, to manage fear. You’ll be able to change your life for the better.

But before pursuing a job that will enable you to express your purpose, research options. Then clarify a job goal that will enable you to express your purpose, and develop a plan to attain your goal. Be flexible as your goals may change as you get to know yourself and options better.

Singleness of purpose is one of the chief essentials for success in life, no matter what may be one’s aim.”John D. Rockefeller

TAG: Dr. Carole Kanchier pioneered the concept of purpose in her work on lifelong career, personal, and spiritual growth. A registered psychologist, coach, educator and syndicated print/digital columnist, Carole is author of the award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Your Life: http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963    

 Dr. Kanchier offers workshops, keynotes and individual coaching to help individuals and organizations clarify and express their purpose: carole@questersdaretochange.com

 

 

 

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Age-30 Transition and the Developing 30s

 Do you feel confused, sluggish, and dissatisfied? Does the desire to try new things take precedence over safety needs? Are you between18 to 34?

If so, you may be experiencing the Age-30 Transition. My research described in award winning Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life redefines life career advancement, and shows how to navigate lifelong career decision making https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

During the Age-30 Transition, many realize they have ignored important needs and interests. Now, new choices must be made and commitments altered or deepened.

At a recent book signing, Rick, 28, a computer engineer shared his story. He chose the computer field because the “money was good.” Now he “wants to do and be something more!” He feels that his life no longer has meaning.

Rick is also discovering a change in how he looks at time. He is aware that life is finite. Death is still just an abstract concept. New experiences are waiting! Rick decided to enter police training/

Women face an even more turbulent time than men during this transition. The “biological clock” increases pressures they face about when and if they want a family. Beverly, a music teacher in her 20s, decided to take time off at 31 to have a child and teach piano at home for the next few years.

During reappraisal at this time, many young adults shift values, priorities, and goals. They become more self-aware, and place higher value on quality of life. Job satisfaction becomes more important than climbing the ladder or higher wages.

Are you experiencing this Age-30 Transition or the Age-30 Developmental Period?

If so, refer to Questers Dare to Change for suggestions on moving forward.

Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

3 Tips for Creating Good Work Habits

  1. Present a professional, confident image. Consider others’ feelings. Be respectful and considerate to everyone. Practice such basic courtesies as returning messages promptly, leaving concise voice mail messages, sending hand written thank you notes and greeting people when entering an office.
  2. Value others’ opinions. Listen when they speak. Offer your opinion after people have spoken. Ask questions when you’re not clear about something. Summarize what you hear people say to correct misunderstandings. Let others know you hear what they’re feeling but not saying
  1. Let others know you appreciate their efforts or accomplishmnts. Feedback and praise are most effective when offered immediately and linked to specific activities, products or attributes.

Review the many suggestions offered in award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life which redefines lifelong career decisions making. Paperback edition: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with clients representing many disciplines. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

 

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

How to Create Good Work Habits

Are your work habits holding you back? Are you aware of your bad habits? Are you settling for less than your best?

Habits are acquired behavior patterns regularly followed until they become involuntary. You may not be aware of some habits because they’re made without thinking. However, superiors and clients will catch them.

Spring is perfect time to make changes that will advance your career. Here are common bad habits and tips on how to eliminate them.

Create good habits from bad habits

– Bad habit – Abusing time  

Good habit:  Manage time. Get up an hour earlier to think and plan. Review daily work activities to identify self-defeating habits such as underestimating time needed for tasks. Make a to-do list and prioritize tasks. Don’t try to do too much at once. Break big jobs into smaller, manageable tasks. Allow for the unexpected. Consult your schedule often and re-prioritize tasks as necessary to ensure you deliver on commitments.

– Bad habit – Fearing failure

Good habit: View mistakes as opportunities. Failure is a powerful teacher. Learn the lesson.  Ask yourself: “Why did the mistake occur?”What elements were responsible?” “How can I avoid similar mistakes in the future?” If you make the same mistake twice, put the lesson in writing. Place the questions and answers where you’ll be reminded not to repeat steps which led to the error.  Measure success by how quickly you recover from mistakes. If you accept setbacks, you’ll continue to grow.

Bad habit –  Criticizing co-workers

Good habit:: When you give colleagues feedback, be constructive. Offer suggestions. Don’t hover or nitpick. Resist the urge to offer advice on non-essential matters.

– Bad habit – Staying in a rut

Good habit:  Reevaluate your career goals and progress. Can your current position help you attain desired goals? If not, think of other more satisfying possibilities. Explore options in your company and field as well as different fields. Consider moving down the corporate ladder. Explore lateral positions or creatively redesign your job. Think about self employment, relocating and retraining. Devise a plan for attaining your goal.

– Bad habit – Adhering to old notions of career advancement

Good habit:: Reevaluate your definition of career development. View career growth as a lifelong process of personal and professional development — a continuing quest to maintain harmony between who you are and what you do.  Select an occupation that is congruent with your personal qualities rather than to please others or for the myth of security.

Bad habit –  Failing to maintain a healthy lifestyle

Good habit:: Find time for yourself. Work is just one component of a happy and productive life. Identify activities that would bring peace and satisfaction to your life (relationship, hobby, spiritual practices or volunteer activity). Reward your successes.

– Bad habit – Using company computer for personal matters
Good habit:  Work on personal projects at home or during the lunch hour. Focus on tasks for which you get paid during business hours.

– Bad habit – Sending useless e-mails

Good habit:: Send relevant information only and ensure that the message content is clear. Verify each message answers the “5 Ws” (who, what, when, where, why).

– Bad habit – Practicing poor business etiquette

Good habit: Present a professional, confident image. Consider others’ feelings. Be respectful and considerate to everyone. Practice such basic courtesies as returning messages promptly, leaving concise voice mail messages, sending hand written thank you notes and greeting people when entering an office.

– Bad habit – Interrupting others

Good habit:: Value others’ opinions. Listen when they speak. Offer your opinion after people have spoken. Ask questions when you’re not clear about something. Summarize what you hear people say to correct misunderstandings. Let others know you hear what they’re feeling but not saying.

– Bad habit – Failing to give feedback and recognition

Good habit:: Let others know you appreciate their efforts or accomplishments. Feedback and praise are most effective when offered immediately and linked to specific activities, products or attributes.

– Bad habit – Abusing company expense accounts
Good habit:  Apply the same smart frugality that you use in your personal life to business expenses.  Save the company money and you will be recognized for it.

– Bad habit – Being impatient with clients

Good habit:: Value customer service. List reasons why customers are important to the business. Take a refresher course in customer service offered by your company or local college.

– Bad habit – Stealing company products

Good habit:: Don’t take products such as office supplies that belong to the organization for business uses. It’s unlawful, and can cost your professional reputation.

Recognize and break poor habits

List habits that are hampering your career advancement. Ask superiors and colleagues for feedback. (Examples include: not following through on promises, not meeting deadlines, not being a team member, not being flexible, not managing conflict, and sharing personal information.

Each week, replace a bad habit with a more productive behavior. Describe how the good habit will advance your career. Observe successful people. Read. With practice, each new activity will become easier, more automatic. Stay positive, focused. Persist.

Review the many suggestions offered in award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life which redefines lifelong career decisions making. Paperback edition: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with clients representing many disciplines. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

Millennials

February 5, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Millennials and the Age-30 Transition

 Are you a millennial between ages 18 to 34? Are wondering what to do with your life?

If so, you may be experiencing the Age-30 transition. This transition from late adolescence to adulthood, is extending in length due to changing economic, technological and societal uncertainties.

During this critical period, you assess who you are and what you want to do. You can now think in abstract terms, look at reality from many angles, and consider the implications of your decisions. You may also look at time differently.  You become aware that life is finite, but you still have time to do it all!

In North America, you are given permission to take time out, delay commitments. You experiment with romantic attractions, work at odd jobs, or try different courses in your first years at college. Adult responsibilities are put on hold so that you can feel free to experiment, explore. Flexible and inner-directed, you may be unlikely to subscribe to authoritarian values.

Ellen studied law because her parents were lawyers, but learned that she had no interest in working in the field. So she too time out to travel, to rethink the direction of her life. Ellen returned from her moratorium with greater self-understanding, and renewed confidence and energy to pursue her self determined career choice, public health nursing.

Recent Census data in both Canada and the U.S. show that 30-year olds today, as compared to those aged-30 in 1975, are less likely to have hit many milestones that have defined adulthood in past decades.

In 1975, the majority of 30-year-olds were working, married, living away from their parents, and had a child. Now millennials, between ages 18 to 34, are living more like the adolescents of the 1970s and earlier. Many are living at home with parents.

Millennials are delaying marriage and family longer than previous generations. Many say they don’t want children. The birth rate for women in their 20s is the slowest of any generation of young women in U.S. history. Perhaps because of their slow journey to marriage, millennials lead all generations in their share of out-of-wedlock births. According to a recent Pew Research Center survey, in 2012, 47 percent of births to women in the millennial generation were non-marital, compared with 21 percent among older women. Some of this gap reflects a lifecycle effect—older women have always been less likely to give birth outside of marriage. But the gap is also driven by a shift in behaviors in recent decades.

The Pew survey also reports many millennials are relatively unattached to organized politics and religion. Linked by social media, burdened by student debt, poverty and unemployment, they are in no rush to marry. Those with lower levels of income and education, lack what they deem to be a necessary prerequisite to marriage – a solid economic foundation.

Liberalism is apparent in millenials’ views on a range of social issues such as same-sex marriage, interracial marriage and marijuana legalization. However, their views on other social issues, including abortion and gun control, are not much different from those of older adults.

Millennials are also North America’s most racially diverse generation, a trend driven by large waves of Hispanic and Asian immigrants who have been coming to North America for the past half century.

Despite their financial burdens, millennials tend to be economic optimists. The Pew survey reports that more than eight-in-ten say they either currently have enough money to lead the lives they want, or expect to live in the future. Some of this optimism may reflect the timeless confidence of youth.

Millennials are less likely than older generations to be affiliated with any religion. However, the majority believe that God exists.

The road ahead for millennials is exhilarating, conflicting, and sometimes overwhelming. The major psychological tasks of this generation, according to Erik Erikson, pioneer of life cycle theory and identity development, is attaining a mature identity. This requires exploring several options before choosing among life’s alternatives; and then committing to choices, at least for a while.

Managing the Age-30 Transition

If you are experiencing the Age-30 Transition, ask yourself:

– What is my dream job?

– What needs and values do I want to express in this job?

– What skills do I want to use?

– What job tasks do I want to perform?

– How much responsibility do I want (senior management, good team contributor)

– What is my ideal salary?

– Where would I like to work (downtown in a large city, rural community, in my home)

– Where can I get additional information about my career and lifestyle options?

To learn more about your desired career and lifestyle options, conduct research. Public libraries, educational institutions, private organizations, the internet, and informational interviews with professionals in your fields of interest are good places to start.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Dr. Carole Kanchier, is full of real life examples, quizzes and guidelines that show how to make wise life career decisions at age-30 and throughout life. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/15r-Life/dp/08408963

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts, and Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

A complementary copy of chapter 1, Questers Dare to Change, is available from Dr. Kanchier’s web site: www.questersdaretochange.com

 

Dr. Carole Kanchier is a best selling, internationally recognized author and columnist, registered psychologist and coach. Carole Kanchier informs, inspires, and challenges adults to realize their potential. In her acclaimed book, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, Kanchier encourages people to review their views of career success, and strengthen Quester traits such as purpose, intuition, and resilience to succeed. Dr. Kanchier chaired the Career Change Committee, National Career Development Association, taught at University of California Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Her columns have been syndicated by World Wide Media, CanWest Newswire and numerous print and digital publications.  She has been a guest on varied North American media broadcasts.

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochangc.com

 

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Where Are You in the Career and Life Cycles?

 Do you feel restless? Are you wondering what to do with the rest of your life?

My research on occupational change, described in Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, suggest growing adults experience cycles of discontent every five to ten years with the average cycle occurring every 7.5 years. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Although we all have our own rhythms of change, we generally proceed through alternating developmental and transition periods. Transitions, which generally begin during late adolescence and occur every decade following are times for questioning who we are and where we want to go. During developmental periods we make commitments to and work toward desired goals.

Simultaneously, we experience the career cycle of entry, mastery, and disengagement. During entry, we enthusiastically learn new tasks. In mastery, we’re confident and productive. If our work is no longer challenging, we lose enthusiasm, productivity, and confidence. This disengagement stage of the occupational cycle tends to parallel life cycle transitions.

Individuals, who feel they’re no longer deriving desired rewards, may change jobs. Al, 40, was bored with his systems analyst job. Few job perks, parenthood, and the death of his mother, precipitated reevaluation of goals. Al decided to pursue his passion, farming.

Some adults stay with the same job, but create new challenges. Eva, a retail manager, always finds new ways of improving productivity.

Traumatic experiences such as illness tend to precipitate reevaluation. When Mark, a fast track executive, was 30, a series of jolts including political hassles and serious illness forced him to reassess goals. He decided to establish his business.

With an average life expectancy of about 83-85 and growing older, it’s possible to change positions or create new challenges at 40, 70, or older, and still have years of happiness. Recently widowed, Elva started her first full-time bookkeeping position, at 88.

Are you experiencing a transition?

Answer yes or no. I: 1) don’t have a sense of purpose; 2) am often bored; 3) don’t feel productive; 4) don’t have an relationship; 5) often think of quitting; 6) have few growth opportunities at work; 7) can’t attain desired goals with current employer; 8) am not in good physical shape; 9) don’t have a healthy lifestyle; 10) have a birthday within two or three years of 0.

Six or more yes responses suggest you may in a disengagement stage of your career cycle, and a life cycle transition stage.

Take charge

Take advantage of growth opportunities your transition provides. Reassess goals and make needed modifications or take time out. You’ll emerge a more mature, satisfied, integrated adult.

Having realistic expectations about impending crises and transitions can help you ease the stress and pain of their arrival. The following provides an overview of the career and life stages and the major challenges growing people experience throughout life.

 Career and Life Stages

The Beginning Career

Late adolescence, which usually occurs from ages 18 to 24 or older, is a critical period. Many decisions we make about career and life goals will affect our growth potential during adulthood. Trying on different roles, adolescents struggle to assess appropriate.

The Beginning Career Advances during the Age-20 Developmental Period, when a person’s first full-time job is assumed. Needs for expansion, career mastery and self-motivation prevail. Little self-evaluation occurs. Lifelong patterns may be established.

The Developing Career

The Age-30 Transition (approximately ages 28–33) marks the beginning of the developing career. Values, priorities, and goals shift; a more balanced life is valued. Short- and long-range goals are pursued. Productivity, fulfillment, excitement and creativity are enjoyed. Occupational and/or job changes may occur.

 The Maturing Career

Age-40 Transition (approximately ages 37–45) marks the beginning of the Age-40 Developmental Period. Need for job satisfaction heightens. Creative leadership peaks, and interest in guiding the young blossoms.

The Strengthening Career           

The Age-50 Transition (approximately ages 48–53 is the beginning fp this stage),During the Age–50 Developmental Period needs for job satisfaction and a balanced life deepen.  Innovative leadership and mentoring activities continue.

The Continuing Career

After The Age-60 Transition (approximately ages 58-63), The Continuing Career flourishes (Age 60 Developmental Period) Career options (including retirement) are explored and evaluated. Continuing opportunities for purpose, meaning, direction, and growth are identified and pursued. Another occupational cycle is completed.

The Flourishing Career

Age-70 Transition (approximately ages 68–73) marks the beginning of the Age-70 Developmental Period.

Decisions to continue paid employment, engage in volunteer activities, or pursue a more leisurely lifestyle are contemplated.

Choices are made and plans implemented to pursue activities that offer opportunities for continuing purpose, meaning, and growth.

The Enriching Career

Age-80 Transition proceeds  the Age-80 Developmental Period. Numerous inspiring stories of Questers in their 80’s continue to learn and grow cognitively, emotionally and physically. They advance their life careers by making contributions to humankind. Barbara McLintock won the Nobel Prize at 81, continuing her research until her death at 90.  Decisions to continue paid employment, engage in volunteer activities, or pursue a more leisurely lifestyle are contemplated. Choices are made and plans implemented to pursue activities that offer opportunities for continuing purpose, meaning, and growth.

The Enduring Career

Many outstanding people did not reach their prime until long after their 80s. Age-90 Developmental Period marks the initiation of the  Age-90 Transition.  After retiring retired from his university teaching position, Peter continues to focus on additional research, writing and serving as a Rotarian.

Questers who have weathered the Age-90 and earlier transitions are adaptive, authentic, whole and possess most other Quester traits. Their wealth of experience, knowledge and practical skills can teach younger generations a great deal about life if they take the time to watch, listen, ask, and respect. Dr Helen Flanders Dunbar, psychoanalyst, and pioneer in psychosomatic medicine at Columbia University called people in their 90’s “nimble nonagenarians”  They have a strong survival instinct and terrific sense of humor

Actualizing Career

During The Age-100 Transition and the Age- 100 Developmental Period the Centenarians flourish. Quester centenarians, who are in the developmental period of their actualizing career, continue to be involved and productive. They are creative, authentic, healthy and wise. They are in control of their life careers.

The Centenarians continue to bloom during the Age-100 Transition and The Age-100 Developmental PeriodDecisions to continue paid employment, engage in volunteer activities, or pursue a more leisurely lifestyle are contemplated. Choices are made and plans implemented to pursue activities that offer opportunities for continuing purpose, meaning, and growth.

Constance Isherwood, British Columbia’s oldest practicing lawyer just celebrated her 100th birthday. “Keep working, you’ve got to keep at it… and keep smiling. You’ve got to have a positive attitude. Don’t let things get you down.  Dr. Euphgraim P. Englemn, University of California San Francisco’s longest tenured professor was going strong at 103. Jean Calment, the French actress, according to Guinness World Records she is oldest person who has lived. She survived two world wars, took fencing at age 85 was riding her bike at100. She died at 122.

 Would you like to make any changes in your attitudes and lifestyle to increase the chances you will live a long, healthy, productive life? Is there something you have always felt drawn to but have not yet pursued? Remember contemporary career development is a continuing quest to improve the fit between your evolving personality and developing career. Only you can establish your own rhythm of change. It is not too late!

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life provides information and guidelines that show how to realize your desired life. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Check your Quester traits: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts, and Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

I would be delighted to send a pdf version for review, and be available for a consultation. Sample interview questions are available.

Many thanks for sharing ways by which friends may change their lives for the better.

Carole Kanchier, PhD

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

 

 

 

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