In the movie, “Star Wars,” Obi Wan-Kenobi gave Luke Skywalker a sword that seemed to have magical powers. The sword was useless to Luke when he lacked confidence in his abilities. But when Luke realized that he had the magical powers within to create his own perception of reality, he wielded the sword with confidence and accuracy.

Do you believe you have control over your life career?

 Indicate T or F.

1. I didn’t get the position because I didn’t prepare for the interview.

2. When I trust my judgment I make wrong decisions.

3. I can solve most of my problems.

4. I’m often a victim of circumstance.

5. I can get any job I want if it’s congruent with my personal qualities and I persist in pursuing it.

6. I’m too old to go back to school.

7. I can learn new skills if I try.

8. I avoid challenges.

9. If I studied hard at school, I got good grades.

10. I don’t perform well under stress.

Scoring; One for each T for odd numbered statements, and one for each F for even numbered ones. Add scores. The higher your score the more you believe you have control over your life. You assume responsibility for your ideas, subsequent actions and consequences.

Take charge

To start taking more control of your career, confront self-limiting beliefs, thoughts, words and behaviors. Pay attention to your language patterns. They influence your conception of reality and affirm your inherent personal power.

Look at the speech patterns below that express dependence and helplessness or independence and control. Choose those that demonstrate choice and responsibility.

– Differentiate between knowing and imagining.

You haven’t given your supervisor a report that was due three days ago. You say to yourself, “He stressed how important it was to submit it on time. He’ll be furious.” How does your internal dialogue continue?

a. “I wonder how I can slip it on his desk without seeing him?”

b. “I don’t really know he’ll be furious. … I’m imagining this. What really happens may be different.”

c. “I’ll take my lumps. I’m late.”

If you chose b you distinguished between knowing with imagining. We can make educated guesses about peoples’ future behaviors based on past experience. But we can also scare ourselves by imagining a negative scenario and convincing ourselves it will occur. Don’t live in a world of untested assumptions. Look for and expect positive outcomes.

– Differentiate between can’t (inability) and won’t (emotional choice).

As you’re finishing work, a colleague invites you to discuss a new job opportunity. You say, “I’d like to but I have to participate at the meeting. Thanks anyway.” When he leaves, you talk to yourself.

a. “I don’t have to go to that meeting. I’m choosing to go even though I’d rather find out about that job.”

b. “Rats, another stupid session when there’s no time to get anything accomplished.”

c. “I have so many clerical tasks to complete that I never have time to look after my career development.”

In selecting a, you’re choosing to affirm that you have a choice, even when you select the same option. We often choose to do things because of the negative consequences of not doing them (getting fired if we don’t choose to work). However, this is still a choice.

When you say, “I choose to,” new options may become apparent. For example, instead of staying in a job you dislike, you can choose to look for another job in the same or different organization, return to school or establish your own business.

– Restructure negative beliefs. Write down all negative thoughts you had within the past day. Rephrase these to make them more positive and to illustrate personal control. For example, if you said, “I’ll never find a job because I’m too old.” Restructure this, “I have the experience, skills, maturity, confidence creativity and persistence to find the position I want.”

Don’t be a prisoner of false beliefs. Ideas don’t come from mysterious external powers.  Rather, your language, thoughts and speech habits express an image of dependence and helplessness or responsibility and power. Empower yourself by selecting language that illustrates personal control.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life shows how to take control of your life career https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Carole Kanchier, PhD carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Dr. Kanchier is available for consultations and interviews.

About the Author: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/ digital columnist, registered psychologist and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life. Dr. Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz and University of Alberta and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

Questers Dare to Change redefines careers and work, and shows how to navigate lifelong career decisions! 

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

The Power of Positive Self Talk
The Power of Positive Self Talk


Self talk can boost you up or take you down. Athletes use positive self-talk to reach their personal bests. Some people use negative self-talk to justify the ruts they find themselves in. Mike and Eugene are examples. 

Eugene, an engineer with an aerospace firm that was terminating workers, kept telling himself and others that he was going to lose his job. Mike, on the other hand, researched options and sent updated resumes to potential employers. Eugene lost his job. Mike was offered a job the day he received his pink slip. When Eugene learned to restructure his thoughts, and updated skills he attained his desired position.

Several other people who learned the power of positive self-talk are described in award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963 


Pay attention to your “‘self-talk” – the conversation you have in your head about yourself and the world around you. Is your self-talk positive, growth-oriented, or negative, constraining?

What does this quiz say about you?
Answer “yes” or “no.”

  1. I learn from my mistakes.
  2. I’m too old to compete with younger job applicants.
  3. I know and accept myself.
  4. I prefer the tried and true ways of doing things.
  5. Career success is defined personally.
  6. I do what I “should” rather than what I want.
  7. I welcome criticism as a way to grow.
  8. I won’t consider relocating for an attractive job elsewhere.
  9. My successes are the result of hard work, determination, some ability.
  10. I’ll accept a promotion to a job I don’t like for money or prestige.
  11. My job gives my life meaning and direction.
  12. I’m looking forward to retirement so that I can do what I want.
  13. I ‘m flexible, self reliant, optimistic.
  14. Career success means having social standing, money to buy good things.
  15. I’ll take a salary cut to further my career.


Scoring: 1 point for each “yes” to odd numbered statements, and each “no” to even numbered ones. The higher your score, the more you possess positive, growth-oriented attitudes. 6 or less suggests you could benefit from positive self-talk.

Self-Talk Tips

– Reevaluate your definition of career advancement. View career growth as a lifelong process of personal and professional development — a continuing quest to maintain harmony between who you are and what you do.

– Know yourself and options. Identify skills, major accomplishments, needs, purpose and other attributes. Explore options that are compatible with your personal characteristics. Specify your ideal job; include field or industry, title, tasks, type of company and location. Don’t choose an occupation because experts predict it will be in demand or to please others. Select one congruent with personal qualities. If you follow your heart instead of “shoulds,” money may be a by-product.

– Restructure your thinking to that of creating a job rather than applying for one. Re-evaluate your career goals periodically. Modify these as you learn more about yourself and your changing environment. Embrace and grow with change.

Continue to learn. Welcome opportunities to discover new technologies and enhance transferable skills, such as computer literacy and verbal communication.

– Think out of the box. Develop and use intuition. Take quiet time daily to tune into your inner self. Meditate on an object like  a candle flame or mantra. Ask dreams for direction before falling asleep sleep. Keep a journal. Communicate with nature.

Create a vision board with pictures of your self living your desired lifestyle.  Affirmations can keep you motivated to attain your goal. Bring your desired goal into the present and fully, emotionally and believe it exists today!

– Enhancer optimism. Believe good things will happen. Every time you hear your inner voice criticize, stop and think of something positive to say such as “I’m making progress.” Write down things you like about yourself such as “I’m flexible and creative.”  Post the list where you see it often.

– Exhibit flexibility and resilience. If you’ve been blocked from attaining a desired career goal, investigate other ways of achieving it.

View risk taking as a learning opportunity. Start with small risks in daily activities. Then proceed to more challenging ones. Think of an important risk you’d like to take. What’s the worst thing that would happen if it turned out badly? Where could you get information and support to make the goal less risky? Break the goal into small steps. When can you take the first step?

– Live in the present. Don’t worry about what might happen. Depersonalize failure. View setbacks as learning experiences. Persist.  Have faith you’ll achieve your goal.

– Be the best you can be. Thank the universe regularly for the positive energy you have to share with others to make the world a better place. You can only receive something positive when you give something positive.

Strengthen other Quester traits such as confidence, creativity, growth, independence and self discipline, described in Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/15084089

Check audio edition; https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1


Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist and author of the award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life and the forthcoming Arouse the Force Within You!  Carole Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz and University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential. www.questersdaretochange.com

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COVID-19 TIME OUT

April 21, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Use Time Out To Re-examine Goals and Plan for Success

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life Shows How

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

Based on ongoing research, award winning, Questers Dare to Change, answers many questions you have about lifelong  career decision making.

* Are you a Quester? Check Quester traits with self-scoring quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

* Courage – A crucial skill in changing times

* Develop a lifelong master plan for career success

* Develop a winning mindset

* Turn setbacks into opportunities

* Understand how job dissatisfaction affects health and productivity

* Are you ready for a career shift?

* Overcome fear of failure

* Entry, mastery, and disengagement – Where are you?

* Find your truth – Complete self-scoring quizzes

… And so much more

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts/ and Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Carole Kanchier will be delighted to send a complementary PDF version of Questers for review, and be available for a consultation or speaking engagement at your request. Sample articles/columns are on Carole’s web site: www.questersdaretochange.com/blog.

Contact: Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

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Use Mind Power

April 8, 2020

Carole Kanchier, PhD

Use Mind Power to Attain Desired Goals

Can we create our own reality? Can thoughts, meditation, visualization, faith and intentions help us achieve desired career goals?

Research suggests that our mind can influence our physical reality. When the body is in peak condition and the trained mind is completely focused, an individual can achieve the extraordinary.

Athletes, who do mental training along with actual practice, show greater improvement than those who only do physical training. Tiger Woods mentally pictures his golf ball rolling into the hole. World class figure skaters mentally rehearse their routines.

Moreover, ordinary people have learned to shrink or eliminate tumors and undergo surgery without medication using similar techniques.

Some use mind power to achieve desired career goals. Barbara, a former Silicon Valley technical writer, imagined herself tending her herb garden and teaching in Hawaii. She’s currently living her dream.

You too can train your mind to achieve desired career — and life goals.

You are the director of your life. You create your own life script by your mental attitude, the thoughts you think.  Mind has unlimited potential, but like other muscles, it has to be built up.

You need to practice mind building skills such as relaxing, breathing, meditating and visualizing desired outcomes. You must also have faith that you’ll achieve your goal and work hard.

Your subconscious mind holds the key to your potential. It takes orders from your conscious mind. To strengthen your mind power, learn through relaxation and meditation exercises to slow your brain wave frequencies at the alpha or subconscious level to seven to 14 cycles per second (the conscious mind functions at 15 or higher cycles per second). Then practice techniques such as visualizing outcomes and stating affirmations to help you achieve desired goals.

Goal attainment strategies

1. Write your goal and deadline. Have a clear, precise picture of your desired outcome. Ensure your goal is consistent with your purpose. Write a paragraph indicating why you want this goal. Include all the benefits to yourself and others. INTEND to achieve your goal.

2. Practice imagery daily. Imagine yourself living your goal today. Do this in a relaxed state, when your mind is at the alpha level. Visualize your goal clearly; include details. Don’t limit yourself by thinking about money, responsibilities or other externals. Hold your desired outcome firmly in your mind.

Experience achieving your goal. Notice how it feels, smells, sounds and looks. If you find this difficult, make a collage or take a photograph depicting your goal.

3. Identify barriers that may hinder you from reaching your goal. Write down how you can overcome these obstacles. Include all the people, groups, resources, personal strengths, and tools that can help you overcome obstacles.

4. Develop an action plan. Every day do at least one activity that will lead you to your goal. Use a daily organizer to plan activities.

Focus on your goal. Concentration is like a lazer beam that cuts through obstacles. Work hard. All your activities should lead to your goal. Ask yourself, “Is what I am doing  moving me closer to my goal?” Turn down promotions if they’re not compatible with your goal.

Consider failure a learning experience as you move toward your goal.

5. Have faith you’ll attain your goal. Faith consist of desire, belief and expectancy. Desire is the initial motivation, the force that pushes you towards your goals. Belief is what sustains you between desire and expectancy. Expect to achieve your goal.

Avoid negativity. Think and talk about things you want, not those you don’t want. Eliminate negative thoughts and feelings such as such stress, worry, hate or anger.  Replace negative thoughts with positive statements or pictures.  Avoid phrases such as, “I can’t.”

If there is the slightest hesitancy in your mind, you’ll not achieve your outcome. You’ll also fail if you try too hard because this suggests you have doubts.

6. Develop a support group. Meet often to review your progress and to get encouragement and suggestions. Avoid negative people

7. Keep your mind, body and spirit in top working order.  If you use you’re mind you’ll get what you want. Make sure you know what you want.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Your Life by Carole Kanchier provides additional tips to clarify and attain desired goals. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible version: Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts/ and

Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

 
Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, educator, speaker, registered psychologist/coach, and author of the award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life and the forthcoming Arouse the Force Within You!  Dr. Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz and University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Carole Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential. Contact Carole: carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com
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3 Tips for Adapting to Chaos

– Guide your own career. Expect change. Look for opportunities to initiate change. Small changes can bring big effects. If you’re unhappy with your job, consider taking a break. Study travel, or work- or part-time in another field.

– Know how to transfer strengths. Skills and knowledge used in one industry can be applied others. For example, skills required for customer service positions such as problem solving and interpersonal skills can be applied to sales and management jobs.

– Clarify and pursue purpose. This is your compass which will guide you through chaos. When you’re in touch with the real you and live out who you believe you are, you’ll have you a sense of direction, inner peace and satisfaction. You’ll be in harmony with changes occurring in the universal system.

– Re-evaluate your definition of career success.  View career growth as a lifelong process of personal and professional development – a continuing quest to maintain harmony between who you are and what you do.

Periodically re-assess life career goals.  In addition to purpose, pay attention to skill development, needs and values as well as changes occurring in work and other environments. As you continue to make job and other moves, you’ll experience uncertainty and the corresponding need for support experienced in earlier moves. Therefore, maintain and build yournetwork, and develop meaningful, supportive relationships.

– Cultivate and use intuition. Intuitive skills help you manage ambiguous circumstances and hazy objectives. Practice relaxation daily to slow your mind and listen to inner signals. Meditate. Ask your dreams for direction before going to sleep. Keep a journal. Pray. Communicate with nature.

– Maintain flexibility. Continue building skills and knowledge.  Learn how to learn. Focus on learning and experimenting with something new rather than previously mastered tasks.

Develop the will to risk. Think of opportunities you’ll miss if you don’t try. Ask, “What’s the worst that could happen?” Then decide whether you could live with the worst scenario or take steps to reduce the chances of it happening.

– Use positive terms to describe chaos. These include innovating, adapting, exploring, expanding, changing.

– Prepare for and welcome the unexpected. Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life offers additional tips fordealing with chaos.

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and consulted with varied organizations. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 
Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

Paperback edition of Questers: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

APRIL 6, 2020

Use Chaos Theory to Manage Change

 Questers Dare to Change Shows How

How can events in Brazil – or anywhere else – affect how you do your job today and even whether you’ll have that job tomorrow?

Sometimes, things appear to come “out of the blue.” Do you know someone who has been downsized – not for the first time, but for the second, or third?  What about the Corona virus? How did this global pandemic begin?

Productive employees may be dismissed as a result of being caught in a wave of change. These workers are often experiencing the effects of disorder common to large natural systems. Indeed, economic systems are natural systems. They are susceptible not only to large, immediate fluctuations, but to distant and small changes.

We look for causes and find none because the relationships do not have one-to-one patterns. Instead, they’re understood using the insights of chaos theory. Chaos theory is attributed to meteorologist, Edward Lorenz. The most frequently used metaphor Lorenz used to explain the theory is that the butterfly fluttering its wings in the Amazon rain forest can cause a storm in distant places such as Vancouver.

Just as that Brazilian event can bring rain or sunshine to your day, so can distant events bring changes to your work. Fluctuations in China’s economy, the war in Iraq, or almost any other event will sooner or later affect the work of people faraway from that event.

Chaos theory explains how a rainforest achieves stability and balance without anybody programming what grows where and why. It shows that the wild chaos of the rainforest, with no imposed control, manages to succeed as a “happy” rainforest – unless interfered with by humankind. 

Chaos theory defines a new attitude. It enables scientists to understand the wholeness of their subject rather than smaller subsections. It demonstrates we’re all part of a complex system in which anything affects everything. A universal tendency of complex systems is to create order within themselves.

That’s what your life career is like. Why notuse insights gained from chaos theory to prepare for unexpected changes? Award- winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Carole Kanchier, shows how Questers manage chaos.

Adapting to chaos

– Guide your own career. Expect change. No matter how secure you feel, circumstances may change. Look for opportunities to initiate change. Small changes can bring big effects. If you’re unhappy with your job, consider taking a break. Study travel, or work- or part-time in another field. Consider similar options if unemployed. Unexpected opportunities may arise.

– Know how to transfer strengths. Skills and knowledge used in one industry can be applied others. For example, skills required for customer service positions such as problem solving and interpersonal skills can be applied to sales and management jobs.

– Clarify and pursue purpose. This is your compass which will guide you through chaos. When you’re in touch with the real you and live out who you believe you are, you’ll have you a sense of direction, inner peace and satisfaction. You’ll be in harmony with changes occurring in the universal system.

– Re-evaluate your definition of career success.  View career growth as a lifelong process of personal and professional development – a continuing quest to maintain harmony between who you are and what you do.

Periodically re-assess life career goals.  In addition to purpose, pay attention to skill development, needs and values as well as changes occurring in work and other environments. As you continue to make job and other moves, you’ll experience uncertainty and the corresponding need for support experienced in earlier moves. Therefore, maintain and build yournetwork, and develop meaningful, supportive relationships.

– Cultivate and use intuition. Intuitive skills help you manage ambiguous circumstances and hazy objectives. Practice relaxation daily to slow your mind and listen to inner signals. Meditate. Ask your dreams for direction before going to sleep. Keep a journal. Pray. Communicate with nature.

– Maintain flexibility. Continue building skills and knowledge.  Learn how to learn. Focus on learning and experimenting with something new rather than previously mastered tasks.

Develop the will to risk. Think of opportunities you’ll miss if you don’t try. Ask, “What’s the worst that could happen?” Then decide whether you could live with the worst scenario or take steps to reduce the chances of it happening.

– Use positive terms to describe chaos. These include innovating, adapting, exploring, expanding, changing.

– Prepare for and welcome the unexpected. Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life offers additional tips fordealing with chaos.

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and consulted with varied organizations. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 
Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

Paperback edition of Questers: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Do You See the Glass Half Full or Half Empty?

Winston Churchill once said, “A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.” Research shows that, on average, human beings are hardwired to be more optimistic than not.

Optimism is an attitude that can positively affect a person’s mental and physical health. Optimism can also help reduce a person’s stress and increase longevity.

Being optimistic is defined as expecting the best possible outcome from any given situation. It thus reflects a belief that future conditions will work out for the best. For this reason, it is seen as a trait that fosters resilience in the face of stress.

Optimism doesn’t mean engaging in wishful or fantastic thinking. It’s a way of looking at the world that gives more agency to the optimist as being at least partly responsible when life is going well. Optimists have healthier outlooks and tend to live longer than their more pessimistic counterparts; they also are less susceptible to the negative effects of illness, fatigue, and depression. However, an unrealistic belief that a person’s future will be full of only positive events can lead them to take unnecessary risks, particularly with their health and finances.

Optimism is a good trait to develop as we face the varied challenges of the coronaviris pandemic

Research indicates that optimism is vitally important in overcoming defeat, promoting achievement, and improving and maintaining health. Studies show that optimists do much better in school, at work, and on the playing field. They regularly exceed the predictions of aptitude tests, and when they run for office, they are more likely than pessimist to get elected. Their health is very good and they tend to live longer.

How Optimistic Are You?

Answer yes or no.

1. I usually count on good things to happen.

2. It’s easy for me to fall asleep.

3. I’m usually confident I’ll achieve my goals.

4. If something can go wrong for me, it will.

5. I’m always hopeful about my future.

6. I enjoy my friends and family.

7. In uncertain times, I usually expect the best.

8. I don’t usually expect things to go my way.

9. Overall, I anticipate more good things will happen to me than bad.

10. I don’t get upset too easily.

Scoring and Interpretation: Give yourself  2 points for responding yes to items 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9; and 2 points for responding no to items 4 and 8. Add your points. The higher your score, the more optimistic you seem to be.

Tips for Becoming Optimistic

You create your own life script by the thoughts you think, and you have the power to change these. One of the most significant findings in psychology is that individuals can choose the way they think.

Pessimists can learn to be optimists by changing their attitudes and learning a new set of cognitive skills.

So can you!

Practice positive self-talk.  “I like myself because … “  “I can … “ “I will … “  Use positive statements about such things as being healthy, being in control, or being blessed. Write down affirmations. For example, “I can change … “

Don’t criticize or complain. Think of ways to improve the situation. Avoid phrases such as, “I can’t or “I’m too old.”

Read inspirational books and listen to positive message tapes.

Concentrate on your successes. Create a “success” collage by gluing pictures together that illustrate who you want to be and what you want to accomplish. Include the goal you want to attain, how you want to look, and the personal and professional image you want to project. Look at it every day.

View problems as challenges. If you lose your job, for example, consider it an opportunity to pursue your dream.

Count your blessings — not your troubles. Put enthusiasm into your work. 

Write down your negative thoughts and feelings. Indicate why you feel this way. For example, when adversity strikes, listen to your explanation. When it’s pessimistic, dispute it. Use evidence, alternatives, implications, and usefulness as guides. Replace negative thoughts with more positive ones. Each time you catch yourself using a negative phrase, say, “Cancel, cancel.”

Take your mind off your “problems.” Get involved in activities that let you focus your attention away from the problem. For example, go to movies or concerts, meditate, listen to music or invite friends over for dinner, or engage in physical activities.

Greet others with positive, cheerful statements. Smile. This generates enthusiasm, friendliness and good will. Associate with positive, happy people who will give you support and encouragement as you work toward your goals. Make other people feel important — and do it sincerely.

Look for and expect good things to happen. Success is 15 percent aptitude and 85 percent attitude. Your attitude will determine your success in your new venture. Fill your mind with happiness, positive and constructive thoughts, desired outcomes, and helpful ideas. You’re special and have unique talents. You’re a winner.

Research indicates that optimism is vitally important in overcoming defeat, promoting achievement, and improving and maintaining health. Studies show that optimists do much better in school, at work, and on the playing field. They regularly exceed the predictions of aptitude tests, and when they run for office, they are more likely than pessimist to get elected. Their health is very good and they tend to live longer.

Questers described in award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Carole Kanchier, discusses numerous other suggestions for strengthening optimism: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with clients representing many disciplines. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 
Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com
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ENJOY SELF QUARANTINE

           Questers Dare to Change Shows How!

 

Many of us are learning that being at home, slowing down, sitting in peace and mediating, can be very productive and calming. This is a great time to review life career commitments, and explore other compatible options. Now is the time to think about how you want to live and what you want to do when this coronaviris challenge is over

So what do you want your life to look at when the world goes back to your new normal?

The 7 ed. of award-winning, Questers Dare to Change redefines life career advancement, and shows how to navigate lifelong career decision

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

Case studies of purposeful, growth oriented, Questers, quizzes, and guidelines show readers how to empower themselves to manage lifelong personal, career, and spiritual growth.

Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Individuals and organizations world wide benefit from Questers.  Questers Dare to Change answers many questions adults have about lifelong decision making and growth. 

* Are you a Quester? Check Quester traits with self-scoring quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

* Courage – A crucial skill in changing times

* Develop a lifelong master plan for career success

* Develop a winning mindset

* Understand how job dissatisfaction affects health and productivity

* Are you ready for a career shift?

* Overcome fear of failure

* Entry, mastery, and disengagement – Where are you?

* Find your truth – Complete self-scoring quizzes

… And so much more

I will be delighted to send a complementary PDF version of Questers for review, and be available for a consultation or speaking engagement at your request. Sample articles/columns are on my web site: http://www.questersdaretochange.com

Best wishes,

Carole

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© carole@daretochange.com

Can You Take a Risk?

Most successful people have learned to risk. The good feelings that result from taking a risk can be incredible. You see yourself as a survivor. You force yourself to grow by calling on abilities you haven’t used. Achieving your goal will enhance your sense of accomplishment, self-confidence and knowledge. This will enable you to move forward in today’s challenging times!

Are You a Risk Taker?

Answer “yes” or “no.”

1. I often wish people would be more definite.

2. When I want something, I’ll go out on a limb for it.

3. If the possible reward is very high, I would put money into a business that could fail.

4. I like to plan my activities.

5. I enjoy taking risks.

6. I prefer job challenge to job security.

7. I enjoy working on problems that have ambiguous answers.

8. I accept the possibility of failure.

9. It bothers me when something unexpected interrupts my routine.

10. I trust decisions I make spontaneously.

11. In games, I usually go for broke.

12. Once my mind is made up, that’s it.

13. I’m in favor of very strict enforcement of laws regardless of the consequences.

14. I try to avoid situations that have uncertain outcomes.

15. I would not borrow money for a business deal even if it might be profitable.

Scoring: 2 points for responding “yes” to each of the following statements: 2, 3, 5, 6,  7, 8, 10, and 11.

10 or higher suggests you enjoy taking risks. You are autonomous, like challenge, are confident, flexible and open to new experiences. However, if your score is 14 or more, your desire to risk may sometimes be extreme. 4 to 8 suggests you may be open to some new experiences, but are overly organized or rigid in other areas; 3 or lower, you prefer a secure, well-ordered lifestyle.

Develop your full potential. Take planned risks. Start today!

Take planned risks

— Make small changes first. This enables you to develop confidence and trust. You can then move on to more major decisions. Experiment with a different hair style or food. Change your routine. At work, offer new ways of tackling a job.

— Have a goal. A risk without a clear purpose can backfire. Focus on things you can change.  Have positive expectations, do your homework, know the pros and cons, and listen to your intuition.

— Believe in yourself. Affirm yourself. Replace any negative thoughts or statements with positive ones. Avoid phrases such as, “I can’t,” “I will never. …”

— Turn failure or crises into growth opportunities. Consider “failure” a temporary setback. Depersonalize setbacks. Learn from these. Ask yourself what you would do differently and then make the necessary modifications.

— Look upon something new as an exciting opportunity to challenge yourself andto grow. If you don’t try, how will you ever find out if you can do it?

— Balance tentativeness with commitment. Set goals but don’t write these in stone. Be open to new experiences.

— Establish a support group. Confide in and ask for help from supportive family or friends. Associate with positive people.

— Describe barriers that are blocking you from making a desired change. For example, Personal Barriers include fear of loss of a secure income; fear of failure (such as starting a new job); fear of what others will think; fear of success; and guilt that change might create family hardships.

Societal Barriers include old notions of “career”; outdated retirement policies; traditional gender roles; and blocks imposed by educational institutions, unions and professional associations.

— Complete the Fantasy Risk Exercise: Think of an important risk you would like to take.  What appeals to you about taking this risk? What would you gain?  What is frightening about this risk? What will you lose?  What’s the worst thing that could happen if it turned out badly? If the worst happened, what would you do?

Where could you get information to pursue this risk? From whom could you get support? What could you do to make this less risky? Less irreversible? 

If you broke the risk into small steps, what would the first step be? How soon could you take it? Do this for each step. Evaluate the outcome of the risk. Did it turn out as expected? If not, why? What have you learned?

Celebrate your success whether or not it turned out as expected. Gradually, you will see yourself as a risk taker.

Strengthen Quester traits

Questers, described in Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, show how to risk! http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963    

Purposeful, growth oriented, Questers, quizzes, and guidelines show how to empower yourself to manage lifelong personal, career, and spiritual growth. Please review sample blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog/

Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

 Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with clients representing many disciplines. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

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 Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

Tips for Clarifying Career Goals – March 18, 2020

1. Know yourself

 Identify passion, interests, needs, skills, strengths and job tasks you want to perform on ideal job.

2. Explore options

Determine fit: read, interview workers on job, take part time work, courses.

3. Clarify goalUse intellect, intuition.

List options on the top of page; on side write important criteria like needs for creativity, security. Give each option rating of 1, 2,or 3. Also use intuition: ask dreams for guidance, meditate. journal. Answers will come.

4. Plan and act

Write action plan, outlining small steps and completion dates, activities and required resources. Expect success. Visualize self performing desired goal.

Questers Dare to Change offers additional suggestions for attaining desired goals. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Review audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Contact:carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

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