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   3 Tips #creating #luck at #work

 Look upon something new as exciting — an opportunity to challenge ourselves and grow. If we don’t try, how will we ever find out if we can do it?

– Review beliefs you developed as a child.. Do admonitions like “Never question authority,” “Save for a rainy day,” apply today?

– Play mental games like “What if….” These require a willingness to think freely, so don’t close doors on ideas. Resist thinking, “Don’t be silly!” or “That’s stupid.”

Believe you have the ability to create luck.

Based on ongoing research, award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, redefines careers and shows how to create luck and navigate lifelong career decision making https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible ed; https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please request pdf version for review. Sample interview questions are below.

Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist,  speaker, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD, Jan 27, 2020

On Serendipity

Adapted from Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

To some extent, feeling lucky hinges on the unexpected, according to research in the Journal of Behavioral Decision Making: a chance encounter that sparks a friendship, a juicy job lead overheard at the supermarket, a surprise eagle sighting on a morning stroll.

Question: Do you feel that a rigid routine — scheduling life down to the millisecond — interferes with lucky moments like those? If so, what are some everyday ways people can invite more serendipity into their lives?

 Response:  Rigid schedules interfere with serendipity. While it’s important to have goals and plans, it’s crucial not to write these on stone. Be open to serendipities and modify goals and plans as new opportunities arise.

Luck only happens if we’re ready to take advantage of opportunities.  Louis Pasteur said, “Chance favors the prepared mind.” Luck occurs when preparation meets opportunity.

Create your luck

– Welcome the unplanned, unexpected. Look upon something new as exciting — an opportunity to challenge ourselves and grow. If we don’t try, how will we ever find out if we can do it?

– Write a weekly success journal.  Note the role luck played in achieving successes and the strategies used to influence luck. Identify people, circumstances, and resources that influenced luck, and strategiesthat appeared to facilitate luck. Perceive patterns, and make connections between seemingly unrelated ideas, objects, or events.

– Take advantage of unexpected good fortunes. Don’t procrastinate. The window of opportunity may not last long.

– Examine attitudes and beliefs we developed as children. Do admonitions like “Never question authority,” “Save for a rainy day,” apply today?

– Play mental games like “What if….” These require a willingness to think freely, so don’t close doors on ideas. Resist thinking, “Don’t be silly!” or “That’s stupid.”

– Build networks. Form links with others to exchange ideas, information, connections, and encouragement.Take initiative. Be open to chance encounters.

 – Take time for silence. Meditate, Communicate with nature.  Learn to just “be.”

 – Attend to internal and external cues. Pay attention to how we feel when we meet a new person. Note where our feet take us when entering a book store. When grocery shopping, take the first apple our hands pick.

Believe we all have the ability to create serendipities.

Based on ongoing research, award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, redefines careers and shows how to create luck and navigate lifelong career decision making https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible ed; https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please request pdf version for review.

Carole Kanchier, PhD; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 

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Are You #Lucky?

January 25, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

When we meet successful individuals, we may be tempted to envy them for their “luck.” This luck is often the result of being prepared when the opportunity presents itself. It also is the result of creating opportunities to make things happen.

While waiting in line for the shuttle to take me to my book signing at an International Book Fair in Chicago, I initiated a conversation with two men standing behind me; one was the Editor-in-Chief of a large Japanese publishing house. Armed with work samples and feeling confident and adventurous, I suggested that Japan might be ready for the ideas presented in my book, Dare to Change Your Job and Life.

After the event, I was again waiting in the shuttle line to return to the hotel when I noticed the Japanese men were directly behind me — reading my book. We all laughed. Tenshoku-ryoku, was launched in Japan nine months later. Was this luck? Coincidence? Destiny? Other? What does luck mean to you?

Luck is often referred to as coincidence, timing, serendipity, synchronicity, or good fortune as a result of chance. It’s an unexpected reconfiguration of events, or things that happen in surprising ways. Louis Pasteur said, “Chance favors the prepared mind.” A myriad of opportunities won’t help unless you’re prepared to use them. Luck occurs when preparation meets opportunity. I was in the right place at the right time. But I also created my luck. I seized the opportunity when it was presented.

Although we can’t control luck, we can all influence luck by having positive attitudes, working hard, and taking advantage of good fortune. Welcome the unplanned, unexpected, and be flexible, open to new experiences. Don’t procrastinate. The window of opportunity may not last long.

Questers, described in Questers Dare to Change. have been risking for centuries. Publius Vergilius (Virgil), a classical Roman poet wrote, “Fortune sides with him who dares.” And Homer noted, “And what he greatly thought, he nobly dared.”

Growth is about taking risks. We willingly take chances every day. Whether we drive, walk, or take public transportation to work, we risk getting into an accident. Every new venture has an element of risk. You can’t grow and succeed without stretching, risking, and making mistakes.

What separates Questers from others is their willingness to take optional as well as necessary risks. For example, if you have an okay job and are suddenly offered another job with more responsibility and a significant salary increase would you take it?

There are many risks to moving on. Will you like the new company, supervisors, and colleagues? What if you can’t handle the responsibility? And if you lose the job, could you find another. Is this risk worth taking for you? .

Security can never depend on outside things and circumstances. It comes from within. Is there security in staying with your present job? Could you lose it due to corporate downsizing? Could a new regional executive come in and change policies and procedures? Would you like these changes?

Luck is No Accident

The greatest risk is doing nothing. Change is the only certainty today. Taking advantage of new possibilities requires risk.

Why are people afraid to risk? It’s normal to fear risk. Some fear is good. It’s important to our survival, tells us when to proceed with caution.

Fear is a reassuring signal we’re about to stretch. But excessive fear stunts growth. Various personal fears and societal barriers impede change.

Personal blocks include fear of losing a secure income, fear that change will interfere with relationships, fear of failure, fear of what others will think, fear of losing control of people or power, fear of success, and uncertainty about what to do next.

Societal barriers to change include old notions of career, outdated retirement policies, the myth of security, blocks imposed by educational institutions, unions and professional associations, family ties, and organizational and government policies.

The intensity of the risk is in the eyes of the beholder. Adults weigh the odds and costs of risking differently. Their confidence levels, perceived probabilities of success, needs, values, and willingness to sacrifice and work hard, all play a part in determining how much they’re willing to risk.

 If you are used to taking risks, you will have developed an inner strength, a resiliency, an ability to cope in tough circumstances. People can’t grow without risk and change. Turtles can’t move forward without sticking out their necks. Humans can’t either.

By following the examples of purposeful, resilient Questers, you can develop courage to risk. Start by taking small risks daily. Questers offers risk taking tips, and shows how to minimize risky decisions.

Award winning Questers Dare to Change redefines career growth and shows how to take lifelong risks..  https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check your Quester traits: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

Review audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts, and Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

 

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

 

 

 

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Carole Kanchier, PhD

– Respect others and value their opinions.  Respect is a key ingredient in nourishing relationships and creating a just society. It requires trust, equality, empathy and connectedness in all kinds of relationships. Recognize the dignity, worth and humanity in all people.  Talk with colleagues. Listen to what they’re really saying.

– Listen attentively. Participate openly, receptivity. Practice the following active listening skills:

Clarify. Ask questions when you’re not clear about something.

Reflect content. Summarize what you hear the person say to correct misunderstandings.

Reflect feelings. Let the person know you hear the emotional content. Listen between the lines. What’s the person feeling but not saying? Try empathy. “If I were experiencing that I would feel sad.”

– Assert yourself. Stand up for your rights in a friendly way. State your perceptions, share thoughts and feelings, and make your needs and desires clear. Stick to facts. Avoid words like “always” and “never’

– Recognize individual differences. Gender, cultural background, birth place, occupation, learning preferences and personality types are just a few factors contributing to different communication styles. Recognizing  and respecting differences can reduce misunderstanding, frustration and resentment.

– Offer Feedback and recognition. Feedback, praise and support are necessary to evaluate performance, achieve feelings of accomplishment, confidence and self reliance, and enhance productivity. Let others know you appreciate their efforts or achievements. Praise is most effective when it’s linked to a specific activity or qualithy

Award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life offer additional tips for enhancing communication and other work skills. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963.  

 

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach, speaker, and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change. Carole Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and conducts varied seminars on career and empowerment issues. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

 

 

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Is Your Communication Style Hindering Career Advancement?

Evan,a brilliant project manager, was demoted despite the fact that he always completed projects within budget and on time. His colleagues and clients thought he was abrupt, critical and aloof.

Effective communication increases our career advancement opportunities, enhances our self esteem, nurtures relationships and helps us manage stress. When we communicate effectively and feel understood, work — and life  are satisfying. We feel in control, valued, trusted and respected. When communication breaks down, career advancement halts and employment openings diminish.

Are you an effective communicator?  

Answer “yes” or “no.”  I . . .

  1. Listen attentively to what colleagues say.
  2. Feel empathy for associates.
  3. Know how people with different cultural backgrounds or learning styles generally react in given situations.
  4. Say “no” when others take advantage of me.
  5. Respect others’ opinions even if they differ from mine.
  6. Recognize others’ contributions.
  7. Summarize what I hear others say during a conversation.

Scoring: Two or more “no’s” suggest you could enhance your communication skills. Here are some tips:

– Respect others and value their opinions.  Respect is a key ingredient in nourishing relationships and creating a just society. It requires trust, equality, empathy and connectedness in all kinds of relationships. Recognize the dignity, worth and humanity in all people.  Talk with colleagues. Listen to what they’re really saying.

– Listen. Attentive listening is an active process. It requires energetic participation, openness and receptivity. Sometimes it requires intense conversation; other times it requires being silent. Practice the following active listening skills:

Clarify. Ask questions when you’re not clear about something. This will enable you to get more information and demonstrate your interest and concern. “Please tell me more about that.” “Can you give me an example?” Some people feel threatened by questions so be gentle and supportive. Be careful with “why” questions. Instead of, “Why do you want to take a night course?” Try, “Is there something special you want to learn?”

Reflect content. Summarize what you hear the person say to correct misunderstandings.

Reflect feelings. Let the person know you hear the emotional content. Listen between the lines. What is she/he feeling but not saying? Try empathy. “If I were experiencing that I would feel sad.”

– Assert yourself. Stand up for your rights in a friendly way. State your perceptions, share thoughts and feelings, and make your needs and desires clear.

Watch your body language. When speaking to others, maintain eye contact. This conveys honesty and confidence. Speak in a level, modulated voice.  Avoid grimaces, lip biting, fidgeting. Relax your arms and legs, stand tall.

Stick to the facts. Avoid words like “always” and “never.” These seldom describe reality and often elicit defensive reactions. Make specific requests rather than complaints. If you want a clean office refrigerator, say: “What can we do to keep the refrigerator clean?” This will initiate more constructive action than: “Look at the dirty, smelly refrigerator. It hasn’t been cleaned for a year.”

Establish appropriate limits for your personal and professional life. Separate the person from the task. Say no to the request without rejecting the requester. If the requester persists, say, “I understand your need, I just can’t take on any more right now.”

– Recognize individual differences. Gender, cultural background, birth place, occupation, learning preferences and personality types are just a few factors contributing to different communication styles. Recognizing  and respecting differences can reduce misunderstanding, frustration and resentment.

Extroverts, for example, may monopolize conversations, take initiative, and talk without thinking. Introverts, who are more private and think before acting or speaking, may find extroverts rude and annoying. Extroverts may find introverts aloof and detached. Both types could benefit from understanding how others perceive them and modify their communication to accommodate different styles.

– Feedback and recognition. Feedback, praise and support are necessary to evaluate performance, achieve feelings of accomplishment, confidence and self reliance, and enhance productivity. Let others know you appreciate their efforts or achievements. Praise is most effective when it’s linked to a specific activity, quality or attribute.

Try working on one communication tip a week. You’ll note positive changes in your relationships and career development.

 

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach, speaker, and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and conducts varied seminars on career and empowerment issues. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Are you a Quester? Would you like to become one? Who are Questers, anyway?

Questers are growth-oriented individuals with a sense or purpose, confidence, resilience, perseverance, and will to risk, who are redefining how we look at career and work!

Check your Quester traits: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

We are all born with Quester qualities. You can see these characteristics in babies and young children. They continuously strive to learn by exploring the world around them. Infants reach out to grasp their parents’ ears, eyes, or clothing and objects in their cribs. As they learn to walk, they have fun exploring every cupboard in their homes.

Children learn to crawl, walk, and build with blocks by persevering and risking. They are not deterred by falls. There is no word for failure in their vocabularies. Children feel good about accomplishing challenging tasks, as you can see by their sparkling eyes, excited waving of arms and legs, and smiles and laughter.

Unfortunately, as people grow older, many lose this excitement for learning; they forget the good feelings that come from accomplishing difficult tasks. Various reprimands, don’ts, shouldn’ts, and shames result in embarrassment or fear of trying and failing. Many adults set up barriers to growth that are manifested in expressions of resistance such as fear, denial, impatience, false beliefs, and low onfidence. They lose touch with their inner child and their Quester traits.

You have Quester qualities within that you can strengthen if you desire. Contrary to popular belief, the personality you developed through your childhood and adolescent experiences needn’t be your wardrobe for life. In fact, you can do a complete makeover any time you want.

Strengthen Quester traits

Clarify purpose. Identify themes: absorbing childhood activities, proud accomplishments, when you’re most energized, a favorite Halloween costume.

Be authentic. Do what’s right for you. Ensure actions are consistent with thoughts and feeling. Set goals in harmony with your purpose.

– Build confidence. Focus on the positive. Avoid, “I can’t.”  Don’t compare yourself with others. Judge accomplishments against personal standards and strive for excellence.

– Continue to learn. Read, take courses, volunteer. Challenge conventional beliefs. Recognize and seize opportunities. Find better ways to do things. Try! Place no limitations on yourself.

– Strengthen courage to risk. Review three successful risks taken. Note what made these successful. Identify perceived barriers for taking another risk and explore ways to overcome these.

– Manage fear.  Identify worrisome issues. Minimize these using appropriate information and resources. Live in the present. Let go of “attachments.” Form a support system.

Create a life in which you can continue to learn, grow, and have choices. Life is an opportunity, take it, life is an adventure, dare it! Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life shows how!

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts, and

Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Request a complementary copy of chapter 1:  www.questersdaretochange,com/free-chaptet-1/

A gratuitous pdf review copy of Questers is available from author, Carole Kanchier, PhD: carole@questersdaretochange.com

Paperback and Kindle editions of Questers: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

 

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach, speaker, and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with clients representing varied disciplines. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

At the root of any successful person, is self control. Whether it’s success in their personal, professional or other life activities, it starts with an intention to be self disciplined. Thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and habits, must all be kept in check!

My ongoing research with workers representing varied fields demonstrates successful people have learned how to use self control to attain desired goals. So can you!

Award winning, Questers Dare to Change https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963 and my blogs offer several examples: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Check audible ed: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Self control tips

– Think positively. Think and talk about what you want. View setbacks as learning opportunities.  When you hear your inner voice criticize, think of something positive to say such as “I’m learning.” Listen to inspirational tapes; read motivational books. Begin each day with positive thoughts. Associate with optimistic, supportive people.

– Strengthen confidence. Know and accept yourself. List you positive achievements and personality characteristics. Post this where you can read it daily. Don’t change to please others. Don’t compare yourself to or compete with others. Affirm yourself. Replace negative thoughts with positive ones.

– Reward yourself.  Each morning think of something positive to do for yourself. Every time you pull through a challenging or negative experience, give yourself a treat.

Best wishes,

Carole

carole@daretochange.com; .carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

 

 

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Self Control At Work

January 12, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhD ; carole@questersdaretochange.com

“In reading the lives of great men, I found that the first victory they won was over themselves.” Harry S. Truman

At the root of any successful person, is self control. Whether it’s success in their personal, professional or other life activities, it starts with an intention to be self disciplined. Thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and habits, must all be kept in check!

My ongoing research with workers representing varied fields demonstrates successful people have learned how to use self control to attain desired goals. So can you!

Award winning, Questers Dare to Change https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963 and my blogs offer several examples: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

 Do you have self control?

Answer yes or no.

  1. I’m pretty good at resisting temptations to go out for lunch when I need to complete a project before leaving work.
  2.  I have a hard time breaking bad habits such as chewing gum when I meet with clients.
  3. I often say things at work without thinking.
  4. I behave inappropriately at employer social gathering, at times.
  5. If something at work is fun, I’ll probably do it, even if I know my supervisor may not approve.
  6. I refuse to eat junk foods at coffee breaks
  7. 7. I’m good at working toward long-term work goals.
  8. I sometimes I call in sick even if I’m
  9. Occasionally, I can’t stop myself from taking home office supplies even if I know it’s wrong.
  10. Co-workers say I have amazing self control.
  11. Computer games sometimes keep me from getting work done.
  12. At times, I do more than my share of the work so tend to get burned out.

Scoring and Interpretation: 1 point for each ‘yes’ to statements 1, 6, 7, and 10; and each ‘ no’ to statements 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 11, and 12. Add your scores. The higher your score the more self control you seem to have. To strengthen self discipline, try suggestions below.

Until recently, research on self-control focused almost exclusively on the benefits of having a lot of it. People who keep themselves in line also tend to be more successful in school and work; and also have better physical and mental health.

Unfortunately, it’s hard to be quite so perfect all the time and some new studies are now investigating the negative side of having too much self-control including the tendency of supervisors to have high expectations on workers with good self control, and people dumping too much work on colleagues with higher self control.

How can one person be so conscious of what they do daily while others simply throw caution to the wind? The answer to this question lies in our habits. Since about forty percent of our behavior is habit-driven, you must break bad habits.

We spend years etching neural pathways in our brains. These pathways take on specific functions such as cycling, smoking, or preparing coffee lattes. Neural pathways automate repeated behaviors in an effort to reduce the conscious-processing power in the mind. This allows the mind to focus on newer things rather than the mundane.

Developing self control

Think positively. Think and talk about what you want. View setbacks as learning opportunities.  When you hear your inner voice criticize, think of something positive to say such as “I’m learning.” Listen to inspirational tapes; read motivational books. Begin each day with positive thoughts. Associate with optimistic, supportive people.

– Strengthen confidence. Know and accept yourself. List of positive achievements and personality characteristics. Post this where you can read it daily. Don’t change to please others. Don’t compare yourself to or compete with others. Affirm yourself. Replace negative thoughts with positive ones.

– Reward yourself.  Each morning think of something positive to do for yourself. Every time you pull through a challenging or negative experience, give yourself a treat.

– Enjoy success. Measure yourself by what you have done, what you are doing, and what you can do. Keep a daily, weekly, or monthly record of your accomplishments and build on these. Each day do something a little better than yesterday. The exhilaration of achievement will make you feel good.

– Build desired self control habits. Start small. Repeat desired habits daily. Instead of promising a 45-minute work out every day, commit to a 5-minute walk around the block.

– Set short and long-term goals. Write these down. Ensure they’re specific and measurable. Develop a plan indicating how you will attain these. Track your progress towards goal attainment. It’s harder to get distracted when you can see the results.  Every morning, create daily goals, and identify the most important task that need to be done during the day. Then act!

Ensure your goal is consistent with your purpose. Intend to achieve these.  “I intend to lose 10 pounds by April 15,  2020.” I’m enrolling in a computer programming class offered by Institution X, April 22, 2020. Visualize your goals. See yourself completing the computer programming course with competence and confidence.

– Make choices in advance. If your goal is to pay attention at meetings, choose to leave your phone at your desk. You can’t play with it if it’s not there. If you want to get on top of your emails, decide how many emails you’ll respond to before doing something else. Just decide before the situation presents itself and you’ll find it a lot easier to remain steadfast.

–  Make lists. Start your day with a list of daily tasks you need to accomplish. Everything from emails to grocery shopping can go on the list.

– Use technology. Some technology tools can help build self-discipline. Additionally, you can set timers that limit the amount of time you spend playing a game, or on your favorite time-wasting website. Fitbit, for example, motivates people to reach health and fitness goals by tracking their work activities, exercise, sleep, weight and more.

– Plan and practice. When you make decisions in advance, you reduce temptations.  If you want to stay sober and professional at the office holiday party, decide in advance that you will limit alcohol intake.

Identify ways to make things that are bad for you less available. For instance, if snacking on salty carbs is a disaster for your diet, don’t buy the potato chips.

If you know you may have a challenging time talking with your boss about a particular topic, plan what to say in advance. Then, schedule the discussion for the time of day when you both have the most stamina and self discipline.

You will not attain self control overnight, but, if you focus on the forgoing, and keep mind, body and spirit in top working order, you’re on your way to success.

Developing self control gives you gain a sense of purpose, inner peace, confidence, and greater control over personal and professional life.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Carole Kanchier, offers additional ways to strengthen self control.

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, speaker, and author of Questers Dare to Change. Carole Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz and University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Keep opinions to self. Don’t share personal problems.

– Clarify facts. Relay facts, not opinions.

– Give gossip a positive spin by restructuring negative story.

Award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, provides additional tips for advancing life career: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audio book: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Contact: carole@questersdaretochange.com

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Test Your Professionalism

January 5, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

My superiors are not attending to safety details . . .” As a professional, how would you handle this issue? What does professionalism mean to you?

 The American Heritage Dictionary and the Oxford Dictionary define a professional as a person having a high degree of knowledge, skill, judgement and continuing practice in a particular activity. Mirriam Webster College Dictionary indicates professionals exhibit courtesy, conscientiousness and businesslike work manners.

Typically, professionals provide a service in exchange for payment or salary in accordance with established protocols for licensing, ethics, procedures, standards of service and training. Professionals generally belong to a professional society that exists to further their profession or trade as well as to protect the interests of the public and their members.

 Test your professionalism

Respond professional or unprofessional.

  1. I usually ignore irritating behavior when interacting with someone.
  2. I’m content with my performance.
  3. I always tell the truth.
  4. When a deadline looms, I try to improve the product.
  5. I often download files from the Internet or newspapers for use in my work.
  6. I usually compare myself to others.
  7. Appropriate job skills are more important than good work habits.
  8. I often engage superiors in conversations regarding how some matters should be handled.
  9. If I know a lot about a topic, I listen to others then explain my viewpoint.
  10. I would report unethical or unsafe practices to the CEO.
  11. It’s OK to be late for meetings occasionally.
  12. I won’t work with a co-worker until we settle disagreements.

Answers

  1. Professional. Don’t take the behavior personally. Ignore irritating but unharmful behavior to avoid unpleasant consequences. Walk away or quietly smile.
  2. Unprofessional. Professionals strive for excellence. They don’t fear trying new and better ways of performing tasks or maximizing services. They take pride in all their work, not just jobs for which they’ll receive high remuneration.
  3. Professional and Unprofessional. This may depend upon the circumstances. It may be appropriate to stretch the truth if it will hurt someone. However, it’s not professional to conceal the truth to destroy a relationship or someone’s reputation
  4. Unprofessional. Be optimal but practical. Know that projects must be completed on time. Perfectionism becomes impractical when it takes excessive time and additional resources.  A perfect product is of no value if it’s not shipped to the consumer on time.
  5. Unprofessional. It’s unethical and illegal to use creative materials without first obtaining permission from the creator. The content of most newspaper articles are protected by copyright. Contact  the authors for permission to reprint or post their work. Federal laws protect the intellectual property of creators. Those not in compliance may be penalized.
  6. Unprofessional. Don’t compare yourself to others. Avoid statements such as, “I can do ______ better than anybody else.” Instead, say something positive about a competitor’s w
  7. Unprofessional. Studies suggest that about 85 percent of dismissed employees lose jobs because they lack appropriate work habits. Behaviors which most often lead to job loss are tardiness, absenteeism, inability to follow instructions, quality of work, consistency of performance, lack of cooperation and personal appearance.
  8. Unprofessional. Be respectful of power, roles, privileges and responsibilities of different hierarchical levels. It’s acceptable for a senior manager to be informal with employees, occasionally asking about their interests and listening to concerns. But it’s not appropriate for subordinates to give unsolicited advice to superiors.
  9. Professional. A highly trained team member acts professionally when he listens to colleague’s ideas and explains his view. However, a person who is knowledgeable about the topic and frequently monopolizes the discussion, is acting unprofessionally.
  10. Unprofessional. Be sensitive to the needs and feelings of others. If you observe someone engaging in unethical behavior, speak privately with the individual and give him time to correct his behaviors before taking details to the supervisor.
  11. Professional. North Americans are conscious of time. Meetings are expected to begin and end on time. Set realistic deadlines, and be conscious of others’ time constraints. If you arrange to meet a colleague at 9 AM, plan for traffic delays and call when you know you’ll be more than five minutes late.
  12. Unprofessional. Separate the controversy from the person. Openly discuss differences. If these can’t be resolved, agree to disagree. Keep your opinion, and let the other person keep his. Focus on the common goal.

Professionalism is for everyone. Professionalism is the underlying foundation supporting all productive organizations. Professionalism increases productivity and quality, reinforces trust, improves teamwork and inspires excellence.

If you’re a leader, model professionalism, and nurture an environment where individuals take pride in themselves and their work. If you’re an employee, adopt a professional approach. You’ll strengthen confidence and competence. Everybody will want you on their teams.

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, other institutions of higher learning, and conducts seminars for professional, and business organizations. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Check Dr. Kanchier’s award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, which redefines careers and work and shows how to manage lifelong career decisions. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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