Archives For Never Stop Questioning Albert Einstein

© Carole Kanchier, PhD  March 12, 2020,m August, 2010

Never stop questioning!” Albert Einstein

 

“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning.” — Albert Einstein

Most successful people share this quality. They’re always curious, search for answers to questions important to them.

Embrace childlike curiosity, pursue the things that interest you, strive to learn something new every day.

People like Albert Einstein, Marie Curie, Leonardo da Vinci, Elon Musk, Galileo Galilei, Maria Montessori, Rosalind Franklin, The Wright Brothers… all varying in where and when they lived, all varying in interests, occupations, age, and gender… but all remarkable people prioritize the desire to learn, grow and make a contribution to the culture.

Questers, described in award-winning, Questers Dare to Change, redefines life career advancement, and shows how to continue learning, growing and navigating lifelong career decisions.

 

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Case studies of purposeful, growth oriented, Questers, quizzes, and guidelines show readers how to empower themselves to manage lifelong personal, career, and spiritual growth.

Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Questers Dare to Change answers many questions adults have about lifelong decision making and growth.

* Are you a Quester? Check Quester traits with self-scoring quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

* Courage – A crucial skill in changing times

* Develop a lifelong master plan for career success

* Develop a winning mindset

* Understand how job dissatisfaction affects health and productivity

* Are you ready for a career shift?

* Overcome fear of failure

* Entry, mastery, and disengagement – Where are you?

* Find your truth – Complete self-scoring quizzes

… And so much more

I will be delighted to send a complementary PDF version of Questers for review, and be available for a consultation or speaking engagement at your request. Sample articles and bio are on my web site: www.questersdaretochange.com/blog.

Many thanks for sharing lifelong life career decision making and growth.

Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@daretochange.com

www.questersdaretochange.com

You Are What You Think!

February 21, 2021

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then is a habit.  Aristotle.

You are the director of your life, and create your life script by your thoughts.

Positive thinking is powerful. Whatever you think about, focus on, read about, talk about, will attract more of into your life. Ensure thoughts are positive.

Mind has unlimited potential, but it must be trained. Research, from varied disciplines including neuroscience and psychology, demonstrate that when the body is in peak condition and the trained mind is focused, an individual can achieve the extraordinary.

Olympic athletes practice mental and physical training. Tiger Woods mentally pictures his golf ball rolling into the hole. Champion figure skaters mentally rehearse their routines. Medical professionals teach patients to undergo surgery without medication using similar techniques.

Mind power can help you attain desired professional goals. Beatrice, a former technical writer, imagined herself tending her herb garden and teaching in Hawaii. She’s currently living her dream.

The mind

Your brain contributes to the state of your mind. Your brains waves and subconscious mind play key parts in your quest for fulfillment. Scientists have identified five brain wave frequencies and how they affect an individual’s state of mind: Alpha, Beta, Theta, Delta, and Gamma. By learning about the deeper states of consciousness, you can use your subconscious mind to attain desired goals.

Your alert, logical, and critical reasoning mind, Beta, has brain wave frequencies of 14 to 38 cycles per second. At the Alpha level, where brain waves are 7.5 to 13 cycles per second, individuals are in a relaxed state. This is the optimal time to program your mind for success.

Apply these principles to train your mind to attain desired goals.

Goal attainment tips

–  Write your goal and deadline. Have a clear picture of your desired outcome.  Ensure your goal is consistent with your purpose. Indicate why you want this goal. Include the benefits to yourself and others. INTEND and expect to achieve it.

– Focus on your goal. Concentration is like a laser beam that cuts through obstacles. All your activities should lead to your goal attainment.

– Practice relaxation and imagery. Imagine yourself living your goal today. When your mind is at the Alpha level, visualize your goal, include details. Hold desired outcome in your mind.

Experience your goal. Notice how it feels, smells, sounds, and looks. If you find this challenging, make a collage or take a photograph depicting your goal.

– Be positive. Positive thoughts attract positive outcomes. Think and talk about outcomes you want. Replace negative thoughts with positive statements or pictures. Don’t hesitate or try too hard; these suggest doubt.

Expect to achieve your goal. You have the power to accomplish the miraculous…

Award winning ,Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Carole Kanchier, PhD, will help you clarify life career goals, and develop a master plan for thriving in changing times. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08VR7QK65   

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach, and author Questers Dare to Change.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with varied individual and organizational clients. Carole Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential. Dr. Kanchier walks her talk!

Contact Carole: carole@questersdaretochange.com; carole@daretochange.com

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ARE YOU A PERFECTIONIST WHO PROCRASTINATES?

Are you reluctant to try new things? Make big plans, but don’t follow through? Tend to be critical of self and others? If so, you may be a perfectionist procrastinator.

Perfectionism and procrastination often go hand-in-hand. Certain characteristics drive perfectionists to delay things. What does this quiz say about you?

Are you a perfectionist procrastinator?

Answer “yes” or “no.”

1. I’m reluctant to try new things.

2. I start working immediately, even on unpleasant tasks.

3. I I tend to be critical of self and others.

4. I enjoy the process as well as the outcome.

5. I see mistakes as opportunities for growing and learning.

6. I make big plans but don’t follow through.

7. If I can’t do it right, there’s no point in doing it.

8. I usually follow through on my plans.

9. I often get caught up in details so don’t have time to finish the project.

10. I put things off until the time, mood or conditions are right.

11. I always complete important jobs with time to spare.

12. I must always be on time and do well.

13. I do not need others to like and approve of me.

Scoring: Three points for each “yes” to statements 2, 4,  5, 8, 11, and 13, and one point each “no” to all the other statements. The higher your score, the fewer perfectionist procrastinator habits you tend to have.

Procrastination is often a symptom of perfectionism. Because perfectionists fear being unable to complete a task perfectly, they put it off as long as possible. Perfectionists also fear that failure will invoke criticism or ridicule either from internal voices or external authorities and peers. The higher the fear of failure and ridicule, the more perfectionists tend to procrastinate.

Procrastination may be easy to spot: Are you working on a company or school project that needs to meet the team deadline, or are you surfing the web, reading Facebook posts, filing papers, or grocery shopping? If you answered yes to the latter, you may be procrastinating.

Conquering perfectionist, procrastination habits

Perfectionist procrastinator habits destroy creativity and productivity, and hinder career advancement. Consider minimizing these habits.

– Face fears. Identify the fear.A person trying to find a job over an extended time period may fear rejection. Someone may refuse a promotion because he’s afraid to fail.

Don’t fear mistakes.  Ask yourself, “What’s the worst that could happen?”  Note what you can do to minimize this.  Look upon something new as exciting. If you don’t try, how will know if you can succeed?

Set realistic goals and plan.  Have clear goals that reflect your purpose. Your purpose is your compass that keeps you on the right path. Your goals and plans should flow from your purpose, and daily activities should be guided by these.

Research your goal.  Know helpful resources (people, organizations, printed materials). Outline goals, strategies and time-lines on a paper or electronic organizer. Modify goals as circumstances change.

– Manage time. Get up an hour earlier each day to think and plan. Periods of uninterrupted concentration tend to enable you to complete projects within set deadlines.

Review daily work activities over several weeks to identify self-defeating habits and patterns. Do you underestimate time needed for tasks?Identify how you can modify your schedule and tasks.

Make a “to-do” list. Write down everything you need to do to achieve daily goals. Prioritize tasks.

Assess what can be accomplished within a given time frame. Don’t do too much at once. Space tasks. Break big jobs down into manageable tasks. Reward yourself for tasks completed. Allow for the unexpected. Balance demanding tasks with more relaxing ones.

– Enhance confidence and optimism. Prepare a list of accomplishments and positive personality characteristics. Post this where you can read it daily.

Think and talk about things you want.Associate with people who believe in you.  Review fortunate experiences in a journal. Note the role belief and hard work played in achieving successes, and strategies used to accomplish results.

Don’t compare yourself with others. Judge your accomplishments against realistic personal standards of excellence. Cultivate the attitude of striving for excellence rather than perfection. Know mistakes are part of learning, excelling, growing.

– Measure success by internal standards, rather than by status symbols or material wealth. Learn to enjoy the process of learning, achieving, and mastering. Research demonstrates that accomplished individuals, who regularly win awards, are driven by the effort rather than the result. Knowing you can attain a desired goal, enhances feelings of confidence and pride.

Award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Carole Kanchier, offers many other tips for minimizing perfectionist procrastinator traits. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08VR7QK65

Author Bio; Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with varied individual and organizational clients. Carole Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential. Dr. Kanchier walks her talk!

Contact Carole: carole@daretochange.com

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Are You Telephone Savvy

February 18, 2021

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

ARE YOU TELEPHONE SAVVY?

Telephone Skills Key to Success

Telephone Communication Skills Crucial for Career Success

The telephone is the most common business tool and its proper use is essential for career advancement. 

Talking with a potential client, customer or colleague on the phone can sometimes be challenging. Without seeing an individual’s face, messages can become muddled and meanings misinterpreted.

Are you telephone savvy?

When you make calls do you:

1. State your message briefly and clearly?

2. Leave your name, organization and phone number, repeating these twice, slowly and clearly?

3. Give the full name of the person for whom you’re leaving the message?

4. State the date and time of the call?

5. State whether you’ll call back or you’d like the other person to call?

7. Ask for a return call at a time you’ll be available?

When you receive calls, do you:

8. Identify yourself?

9. Use courtesies such as “Please hold while I complete another call.”

10. Offer to take messages when you’re answering for someone?

11. Repeat the caller’s name and number to make sure they’re correct?

12. Speak in a professional manner? 

13. Does your answering machine have a pleasant, professional and courteous message? Leave a good impression?

Scoring: One point for each yes. The higher your score, the more positive telephone skills you possess. A score of 9 or less suggests you should enhance your skills.

Review telephone basics

1. Knowledge: Before you make a call have the required information.

2. Goals: Know what you want to accomplish.

3. Attitude: Make the person feel you’re interested in him and the message.

– Make a great first impression. Show the caller you’re helpful, confident and competent. If a potential employer’s first contact is over the phone, she gets cues from your voice. What kind of impression are you giving?

Influence your listener’s reactions by controlling the pace, pitch, inflection and tone of your voice.  Strive for an energy level that matches your normal conversation. A soft voice suggests shyness or uncertainty; a loud voice implies anger or worry. Be alert to your caller’s needs. If he’s having trouble hearing, speak louder, more slowly.

Speak briskly but pronounce words clearly. When you talk too fast, you sound hurried or excited and are difficult to understand; when you too speak slowly, you sound tired, lazy or uninterested.

Inflection adds special meaning to your message. If, for example, you say, “John needs help with his resume this afternoon,” you’re suggesting John needs help. If you say, “John needs help with his resume — this afternoon, —  your indicating he needs help this afternoon.

Different tones of voice can make us feel differently — happy, angry, hurt, etc. Keep your tone attentive, interested and friendly. Smiling adds a pleasant tone to your voice.

– Be courteous, respectful. People are turned off by careless or rude remarks. Always say hello and identify yourself. Ask how you can help. Use courtesy words, “Thank you for waiting.”  If you need to put the caller on hold, ask, and wait for an answer. If you need to phone back, indicate when you’ll call.

End the call positively, for example, “Thanks for calling.”  Let the caller hang up first. This gives him control of the ending as well as an opportunity to ask further questions. Don’t eat, drink, or chew gum.

– Leave clear, concise messages. State your name and phone number. Repeat these twice. Give the name of the person you’re calling and date and time you called. If the person doesn’t return your call, phone again a few days later. For other message skills, review the telephone savvy questions.

 If an employer calls, and you’re not prepared for the session, ask the employer if you can return the call, or if he can call back at a mutually convenient time. This gives you time to prepare.

Keep the forgoing in mind when you call or receive phone calls. Your confidence and career advancement will improve as you hone your phone skills. Next week part 2 of telephone skills will be posted.

Additional tips for strengthening telephone and other job skills are discussed in award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life: http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963    

Visit Carole Kanchier’s blog for more tips to enhance personal and professional growth. http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog 







 

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Are You a #Risk Taker?

February 14, 2021

Most successful people have learned to risk. The good feelings that result from taking a risk can be incredible. You see yourself as a survivor. You force yourself to grow by calling on abilities you haven’t used. Achieving your goal will enhance your sense of accomplishment, self-confidence and knowledge.

Are You a Risk Taker?

Answer “yes” or “no.”

1. I often wish people would be more definite.

2. When I want something, I’ll go out on a limb for it.

3. If the possible reward is very high, I would put money into a business that could fail.

4. I like to plan my activities.

5. I enjoy taking risks.

6. I prefer job challenge to job security.

7. I enjoy working on problems that have ambiguous answers.

8. I accept the possibility of failure.

9. It bothers me when something unexpected interrupts my routine.

10. I trust decisions I make spontaneously.

11. In games, I usually go for broke.

12. Once my mind is made up, that’s it.

13. I’m in favor of very strict enforcement of laws regardless of the consequences.

14. I try to avoid situations that have uncertain outcomes.

15. I would not borrow money for a business deal even if it might be profitable.

Scoring: 2 points for responding “yes” to each of the following statements: 2, 3, 5, 6,  7, 8, 10, and 11.

A score of 10 or higher, suggests you enjoy taking risks. You are autonomous, like challenge, are confident, flexible and open to new experiences. However, if your score is 14 or more, your desire to risk may sometimes be extreme. A score of 4 to 8 suggests you may be open to some new experiences, but are overly organized or rigid in other areas. If you scored 3 or lower, you prefer a secure, well-ordered lifestyle.

Strengthen ability to risk.

If you want to develop your full potential, learn to take planned risks. Try some of the following:

— Make small changes first. This enables you to develop confidence and trust. You can then move on to more major decisions. Experiment with a different hair style or food. Change your routine. At work, offer new ways of tackling a job.

— Have a goal. A risk without a clear purpose can backfire. Focus on things you can change.  Have positive expectations, do your homework, know the pros and cons, and listen to your intuition.

— Believe in yourself. Affirm yourself. Replace any negative thoughts or statements with positive ones. Avoid phrases such as, “I can’t,” “I will never. …”

— Turn failure or crises into growth opportunities. Consider “failure” a temporary setback. Depersonalize setbacks. Learn from these. Ask yourself what you would do differently and then make the necessary modifications.

— Look upon something new as an exciting opportunity to challenge yourself andto grow. If you don’t try, how will you ever find out if you can do it?

— Balance tentativeness with commitment. Set goals but don’t write these in stone. Be open to new experiences.

— Establish a support group. Confide in and ask for help from supportive family or friends. Associate with positive people.

— Describe barriers that are blocking you from making a desired change. For example, Personal Barriers include fear of loss of a secure income; fear of failure (such as starting a new job); fear of what others will think; fear of success; and guilt that change might create family hardships.

Societal Barriers include old notions of “career”; outdated retirement policies; traditional gender roles; and blocks imposed by educational institutions, unions and professional associations.

— Complete the Fantasy Risk Exercise: Think of an important risk you would like to take.  What appeals to you about taking this risk? What would you gain?  What is frightening about this risk? What will you lose?  What’s the worst thing that could happen if it turned out badly? If the worst happened, what would you do?

Where could you get information to pursue this risk? From whom could you get support? What could you do to make this less risky? Less irreversible? 

If you broke the risk into small steps, what would the first step be? How soon could you take it? Do this for each step. Evaluate the outcome of the risk. Did it turn out as expected? If not, why? What have you learned?

Celebrate your success whether or not it turned out as expected. Gradually, you will see yourself as a risk taker.

Creating a life worth living and finding the courage to risk pursuing you dreams isn’t easy, but you can do it! Questers, described in award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, show you how! http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963    

Check audible Questers:  https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist,  speaker, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier, who has worked with clients representing varied industries, is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.  Dr. Kanchier is available for consultations and speaking engagements.
Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; http://www.questersdaretochange.com
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Small Talk – Career Success

February 11, 2021

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Small Talk Leads to Career Success

Do you feel comfortable starting conversations? Do you make small talk at social gatherings or business meetings? Whether you’re up for a promotion or looking for a new job, small talk can help create connections.

Studies show the ability to converse with people is related to career success. Building rapport is a skill that requires practice. Don’t wait for someone to take interest in you. Take the first step.

– Chat with one new person every day. Converse with everyone: cashiers, waiters, people in the grocery check line, and doctors’ waiting rooms.  Accept invitations.

Prepare. Before an event, review possible discussion topics. Skim your newspaper’s sports, business, and movie sections.

– Be approachable. Act confident, comfortable. Don’t cross your arms. A smile, nod, and handshake are welcoming. Say “hello” first. Introduce yourself offering some information about yourself.

– Start a conversation. Introducea topic of mutual interest or make a general comment about the weather or other. Unusual accessories such as a broach or favorite object on your desk can be conversation starters.

Ask open-ended question about an event or hot news topic. Think of questions that begin with “why,” “how,” or “what?” “How long have you been coming to these meetings …?”  “What do you think of …?”

Compliment the person:”I love your suit.” “It must have taken a lot of courage to start your own business.”  

Listen. Focus on the person with whom you’re speaking. Pay attention, give feedback. Before entering into a conversation in progress, observe and listen.

– Avoid personal, philosophical, political, and controversial topics. Maintain integrity, dignity, and optimism.

Exit a conversation graciously. When you feel the conversation is reaching a logical pause, say, ”I’ve enjoyed talking to you, but I don’t want to monopolize your time.” Exchange business cards if you want to know the person better.

– Use small talk during business interviews. View the interviewer as a person. Show interest in the company, its future, and the job. Ask questions. Respond to conversational overtures.   

Connect with people regularly. Small talk is the starting point of all relationships and business deals.

The 7 edition of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life offers many other ideas and strategies for building career success and satisfaction. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08VR7QK65    

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life. Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and consulted with varied individuals, professional groups and organizations. Carole Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.. Dr Kanchier walks her talk!

Contact Carole: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; http:// www.questersdaretochange.com

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Thrive Today

February 8, 2021

Thrive in Challenging Times

 

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life Shows How

The 7 ed. of award-winning, Questers Dare to Change, by Carole Kanchierredefines life career advancement, and shows how to navigate lifelong personal and professional decisions.

Based on ongoing research, case studies of purposeful, growth oriented, “Questers”, quizzes, and guidelines show how to reassess goals and create desired life career.

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMD

Individuals and organizations world wide benefit from Questers Dare to Change .It answers many questions adults have about lifelong decision making and growth.

 
* Are you a Quester? Check Quester traits: 

http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

* Courage – A crucial skill in changing times

* Develop a lifelong master plan for career success

* Develop a winning mindset

* Understand how job dissatisfaction affects health and productivity

* Are you ready for a career shift?

* Overcome fear of failure

* Entry, mastery, and disengagement – Where are you?

* Find your truth – Complete self-scoring quizzes

… And so much more

Please request a complementary PDF version of Questers for review. Dr Kanchier is available for consultations and speaking engagements. Sample articles are on http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog/

Many thanks for considering this invitation to share ways people can strengthen personal, career and spiritual growth.

Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; http:// www.questersdaretochange.com

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and consulted with varied individuals, professional groups and organizations. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.. She walks her talk!

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Is Temp Work Right For You?

January 25, 2021

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Is Temp Work Right For You?

Meg hasn’t held a steady job for a year, and she likes it that way. She workas a contract worker, writing and editing technical service manuals for a Silicon Valley firm. She’s happy to be one of the thousands of temporary workers in North America.

Today, people have many employment choices, including temp work. Temporary services are booming. Temp employment can be a source of flexible, fulfilling work that can provide a bridge to full-time employment. According to research, one-third of temp employees prefer this arrangement over traditional employment options.

Are you suited to temporary employment?

Answer “yes” or “no:”  I like . . .

1. Trying different kinds of work.

2. Working where and when I choose.

3. Earning good or extra money.

4. Investigating a company before making a long-term commitment.

5. Developing new skills.

6. Meeting new people.

7. Adapting to new situations and surroundings.

Five or more yes responses suggest you may enjoy temp work. Temporary employment can benefit both workers and client companies.

Because companies must constantly shift gears to meet the changing demands of the global marketplace, they need to have 10 to 20 percent of their work force as temporary. The Conference Board (a business intelligence organization that distributes information about management and the marketplace) found that about 90 percent of U.S. businesses use temp workers to meet demand periods, cover employee absences, and work on special projects. Companies also like to observe temps during a trial period to determine their suitability for permanent positions.

More than three million temporary and contract employees work for America’s staffing companies during an average week. During the course of a year, North America’s staffing companies hire nearly17 million temporary and contract employees.

Companies find that effective use of temporary staffing can increase productivity and profit levels. Many organizations prefer using staffing firms to find suitable employees over posting job wanted ads. Employers tend to hold temp workers to as high a standard as they do full-time employees.

Many staffing firms offer competitive benefit packages which include medical insurance and bonus pay. Cash awards, gift certificates and free lunches for top employees are other perks. Opportunities to acquire computer or other skills are added benefits.

Varied types of workers seek the assistance of the 19,000 staffing offices nation wide. These include burned-out professionals who want to try something else, homemakers re-entering the work force, and people who need second jobs to meet expenses. Opportunities abound for engineers, financial analysts, word processors, human resources personnel, and varied managerial levels and health professionals. 

Temp jobs can last from a day to several months. The average tenure is 10 weeks. Many temp or contract workers stay much longer. A number get hired permanently.

People select temporary employment for many reasons. It can be a bridge to a full-time job and relieves some of the financial and emotional stress during job search or college/university attendance. It also provides flexible hours, days and assignments. Gaining new skills while making valuable business contacts is another benefit. Employees who want medical, pension or other benefits can also find these perks with some staffing firms.

You have the option of being a full-time temp or combining temp work with traditional employment and/or self employment. If your goal is to work as a permanent, full-time employee, but are having difficulty finding the right job or company, temp work can help pay the bills. If you’re looking for new ways to work, want to learn varied skills, investigate a different industry, have more flexibility or control over your career or work schedule, temp work is an option.

To get the most out of temp assignments, get to know temp agencies in your area. Many temp agencies focus on specific industries including account staffing, technology staffing, legal staffing, finance staffing and other.  Maintain regular contact with them. Inquire about the benefits they offer, and get information about their clients (employers). Find out what kinds of jobs are available, their respective salaries and locations of employers. Let them know that you’re eager to learn new skills and gain experience in a certain field. If your goal is full-time, permanent employment, advise them of this.

Don’t pass up opportunities to learn. Don’t expect each temp job to be perfect, but see each as a valuable experience that can help you achieve your career goal.

For more information about staffing firms in your area, check the local phone directory. Also check the internet for local firms as well as the American Staffing Association’s website: www.staffingtoday.net.

Award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Carole Kanchier, discusses numerous other ways to access temp agencies and find jobs: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Carole Kanchier, PhD, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change, shows how to determine job suitability and attain desired life career goals. carole@daretochange.com; http;// www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Authenticity: A Crucial Skill for Changing Times

The word, “authenticity” comes from the Greek root authentikos, meaning “original, genuine, principal.” Authentic people are genuine, self actualizing and have a sense of purpose. Along with fearless passion and courage, they possess strong mental discipline. 

Authenticity does not come from title, social stature, or wealth, but rather from how we live. That is, how we go about pursuing our purpose and making a contribution in our own unique way. Authentic people prevail in changing times because they are in harmony with the energy of the universe. Most Questers, described in Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, are authentic: www.questersdaretochange.com.

How authentic are you?

Check qualities you possess. I

1 perform daily activities in unique ways

2 work hard

3 share honest opinions

4 enjoy being alone

5 am self aware

6 am curious

7 love intellectual stimulation

8 am respectful of others

9 recognize inter-relationships

10 seek new opportunities

11 exude vibrancy

12 care about environmental issues

13 live in the moment

Scoring: The more statements you checked, the more authentic you seem to be.

Fostering authenticity

To be authentic, you must understand who you are, what you want to be, and how you want to fit in the world.  You should be self-guided.

– Build self esteem. Confidence gives you courage to set high expectations, to risk, to grow, to be authentic. Acknowledge your accomplishments. Prepare a list of positive achievements and personality characteristics. Post this where you can read it daily. Don’t change to please others or compare yourself to or compete with others.  

Stretch yourself. Constantly push the envelope, raising standards. Challenge conventional beliefs and paths. Travel uncharted territories. Although this may invoke disappointments, accepting and growing through challenges enhances authenticity.

– Be in the moment. Engage yourself completely in the activity at hand.

– Maintain perspective. Time and distance can make mountains seem like molehills. Don’t let what happened yesterday affect what will happen tomorrow. Face each challenge with an open mind.  Look upon setbacks as one step toward growth and authenticity.

Take comfort in uncertainty.  This unchartered path evolves moment-by-moment.  Realize the path is the goal. Everything is workable. 

– Focus on the positive. Look for and expect good things. Each time you catch yourself thinking something negative, replace it with a more positive thought.

– Strengthen resilience. Note what you’ve learned from traumatic experiences. Indicate how these have made you stronger, wiser, more authentic. Identify early cues that you’ve ignored, and what you’d now do differently.

– Bolster courage to risk. Review three successful risks taken. Note what made these successful. Identify perceived barriers for taking another risk, and explore ways to overcome them.

– Manage fear. Identify worrisome issues. Minimize these by researching relevant information and resources. Live in the present. Let go of “attachments.”

– Create a life in which you continue to grow and have choices. Make choices in harmony with your authentic self. “Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life” shows how.

Author: Dr. Carole Kanchier, career and personal growth expert, is a registered psychologist, coach, speaker and author of award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life: http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963:

Email: carole@daretochange.com 

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Are You a Risk Taker?

January 22, 2021

© Carole Kanchier, PhD       

Are You a Risk Taker?

Are you a risk taker? If you said no, think again. You may be more of a risk taker than you think.

Dan works as a sales clerk to support his fledgling acting career. Before that he taught school, following 11 years as a computer programmer. You may perceive Dan to be a risk taker having left two positions which had good security and pay.  But Dan doesn’t see himself as a risk taker. For Dan, risk involves physical activities such as mountain climbing.

Most of us are more conscious of the risks we avoid than those we take. That’s why we don’t think we’re risk takers. And because we’re aware of the risks we avoid, we assume that others take bigger risks. But they may be avoiding risks we’re taking. So risk, in this sense, is in the eye of the beholder.

What’s risky to you?

  • Physical danger — sky diving, skiing, taking drugs, having cosmetic surgery?
  • Psychological/Emotional — staying in a dead-end job, getting married or divorced?
  • Social — giving a presentation, telling jokes at a company party, traveling solo in a foreign country?
  • Intellectual — taking a graduate course, chairing a high-level policy meeting?
  • Economic — investing in stocks, buying a home, starting a business?
  • Career — changing jobs or any combination of the above?

Enhancing ability to risk

– Think about three successful risks you’ve taken in any life component. What did you do to make it turn out well?  In which categories did the risks fall? What have you learned about yourself and your risk taking behavior?

– Describe barriers that are blocking you from making a desired change. For example, Personal Barriers include fear of loss of a secure income; fear of failure (such as starting a new job); fear of what others will think; fear of success; and guilt that change might create family hardships.

Societal Barriers include old notions of “career”; outdated retirement policies; traditional gender roles; and blocks imposed by educational institutions, unions and professional associations.

Identify ways which you can overcome these barriers.

– Let go of “attachments.” The more attached you are to something, the greater the fear of losing it. Ask yourself, “What do I want to let go of?” “What’s the worst thing that can happen if I let go?” “What people, resources and support would make my goal less risky?”

– Live in the present. Because most fear centers around the future, don’t spend time worrying about what might happen.

– Know yourself. Clarify your purpose, strengths and priorities.What do you really want to do? How does this differ from what others think you should do? Replace the “shoulds” with your own values. As you turn your priorities around, risking will become easier. It’s simpler to risk for something you’re passionate about.

– Clarify a goal in harmony with your purpose. State and write down your goal and outline a plan to achieve it.  Break the goal down into small steps. What’s the first step you could take? When could you take it? Do this for each step.

– Watch your “self-talk.” Each time you catch yourself saying something that fuels your fear, say “cancel,” and replace it with a more positive statement. Shift your vocabulary from being a victim to someone with power and strength.

– Educate yourself. Read books, listen to tapes, or take courses on building confidence, strengthening ability to risk, or any other topic of interest.

View setbacks as learning experience as you move toward your goal. Failure can be reduced by researching, planning and persisting. Depersonalize setbacks. Ask yourself what you would do differently and then make the necessary modifications.

– Look upon something new as an exciting opportunity to challenge yourself and grow. If you don’t try, how will you ever find out if you can do it?

– Balance tentativeness with commitment. Set goals but don’t write these in stone. Be open to new experiences.

– Establish a support group. Confide in and ask for help from supportive family or friends. Associate with positive people.

– Complete the Fantasy Risk Exercise: Think of an important risk you would like to take.  What appeals to you about taking this risk? What would you gain?  What is frightening about this risk? What will you lose?  What’s the worst thing that could happen if it turned out badly? If the worst happened, what would you do?

Where could you get information to pursue this risk? From whom could you get support? What could you do to make this less risky? Less irreversible? 

If you broke the risk into small steps, what would the first step be? How soon could you take it? Do this for each step. Evaluate the outcome of the risk. Did it turn out as expected? If not, why? What have you learned?

Celebrate your success whether or not it turned out as expected. Gradually, you will see yourself as a risk taker.

Creating a life worth living and finding the courage to risk pursuing you dreams isn’t easy, but you can do it! Questers, described in Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, show how to risk and strengthen other winning Quester traits! http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963    

Author bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist and author of the award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life and the forthcoming Arouse the Force Within You!  Dr. Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz and University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and consulted with varied individuals and organizations.. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential. http://www.questersdaretochange.com

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

www.http://questerdaretochange.com/blog

Tips For Attaining Life Career Goals

Create new opportunities with current or another employer. Consider time out, full or part-time study, travel or self employment.

– Know and accept yourself. Know your purpose. Work at achieving goals compatible with your purpose. Believe you’ll attain them.

– Identify personal and transferable skills. Adaptive skills like openness to ideas, persistence, critical evaluation, enthusiasm, helpfulness, patience, optimism and tolerance are prized.  So are “meta skills.” including problem solving, research, judgment, inspiration, relationship building, ethical leadership, mental training and emotional intelligence. 

Continuously update technical and professional skills and strengthen Quester qualities like authenticity, purpose, risk, confidence and resilience.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Dr. Carole Kanchier. gives numerous tips for creating desired life career. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, keynote speaker, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with varied individual and organizational clients. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential. Carole is available for consultations and interviews

 
Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com
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