Archives For Never Stop Questioning Albert Einstein

© Carole Kanchier, PhD  March 12, 2020,m August, 2010

Never stop questioning!” Albert Einstein

 

“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning.” — Albert Einstein

Most successful people share this quality. They’re always curious, search for answers to questions important to them.

Embrace childlike curiosity, pursue the things that interest you, strive to learn something new every day.

People like Albert Einstein, Marie Curie, Leonardo da Vinci, Elon Musk, Galileo Galilei, Maria Montessori, Rosalind Franklin, The Wright Brothers… all varying in where and when they lived, all varying in interests, occupations, age, and gender… but all remarkable people prioritize the desire to learn, grow and make a contribution to the culture.

Questers, described in award-winning, Questers Dare to Change, redefines life career advancement, and shows how to continue learning, growing and navigating lifelong career decisions.

 

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Case studies of purposeful, growth oriented, Questers, quizzes, and guidelines show readers how to empower themselves to manage lifelong personal, career, and spiritual growth.

Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Questers Dare to Change answers many questions adults have about lifelong decision making and growth.

* Are you a Quester? Check Quester traits with self-scoring quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

* Courage – A crucial skill in changing times

* Develop a lifelong master plan for career success

* Develop a winning mindset

* Understand how job dissatisfaction affects health and productivity

* Are you ready for a career shift?

* Overcome fear of failure

* Entry, mastery, and disengagement – Where are you?

* Find your truth – Complete self-scoring quizzes

… And so much more

I will be delighted to send a complementary PDF version of Questers for review, and be available for a consultation or speaking engagement at your request. Sample articles and bio are on my web site: www.questersdaretochange.com/blog.

Many thanks for sharing lifelong life career decision making and growth.

Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@daretochange.com

www.questersdaretochange.com

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@questersdaretochange.com

#Perseverance: A Secret to #Success

Mark’s first try at establishing his sportswear store failed. After re-evaluating his experience, he opened another store. Mark is now the proud owner of four successful sportswear stores.

Mark didn’t fail in his first attempt. Failure occurs when we quit or stop trying. Mark has perseverance. He kept improving his products and services.

Perseverance is the key to success. After thousands of efforts to make the electric light bulb, Thomas Edison said, “I haven’t failed, I’ve identified 10,000 ways that it doesn’t work.” Helen Keller, Abraham Lincoln, Marie Curie and an endless list of other great achievers found that success inevitably arrives for everyone who perseveres.

Acquiring a desired job or promotion or succeeding at business may present challenges, but this is part of the learning process. Ultimately, individuals who persist, become successful. They learn from mistakes.

Do you persevere? Or, after meeting rejection or difficulties, do you quit?

Test Your Perseverance Quotient

Give yourself one for each “yes” to the following:

   1. I believe in myself.

   2. I have clear career goals.

   3. I address my limitations.

   4. I bounce back from disappointments.

   5. I persist.

   6. My family and friends support me in my pursuit of goals.

   7. I can adapt to change.

   8. I focus and complete projects.

   9. My goals are consistent with my purpose and values.

  10. I can take unpopular stands when I believe I’m right.

Add your “yes” scores. The higher your score, the more perseverant you tend to be. You may be a Quester. Test your Quester quotient: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

Tips for Persevering

Clarify your goal. Base it on your purpose, needs, and abilities. Know why you want this goal and how you and others will benefit.

— Intend to achieve your goal. Outline your goal, strategies, and timeline. Know resources that can help you attain it, including individuals and the Internet. Break the goal into small steps, working backward from your desired outcome and attainment date.

— Maintain optimism. Expect good things. Keep a daily diary of good experiences.

— Acknowledge your accomplishments. Judge these against personal standards of self improvements. Have the courage of your convictions. Don’t change for others or compare yourself with them.

— Live in the present. Don’t dwell on the past or worry about what might happen. Let go of attachments. The more attached you are to something, the greater the fear of losing it.

— Try new experiences. Experiment with new ways of improving a product or service at work or other activities. Investigate how successful individuals or teams have achieved similar goals.

— Care for you mind, body, emotions, and spirit. Schedule quiet times to think and reassess. Practice stress relievers such as deep breathing and exercise. Get sufficient sleep, eat healthy, and take time for fun and friends.

— Experience yourself living your goal today. Hold your desired outcome firmly in your mind. See, smell, touch, and hear aspects of your goal. Each morning upon rising, review your goal. Repeat the process at night.

8. Persist. Focus on goals daily. At regular intervals, ask yourself whether your activities are moving you forward. Additional Questers’ success secrets are found in Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963.

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts, and

Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Based on ongoing research, Questers helps people understand change, and empower themselves to manage uncertainty

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, speaker, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change shows how to reevaluate lifelong personal and professional goals and plan for success.

Carole Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Dr. Kanchier is available for consultations and interviews. Her team will be delighted to send a complementary PDF of Questers Dare to Change for review

Contact: carole@daretochange.com;  www.questersdaretochange.com

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Keeping Your Cool

July 3, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Keeping Your Cool

< Dare to Change Your Job and and Life describes how to manage anger and take charge of lifelong career growth: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Have you been so angry that you wanted to throw something at another colleague? Lost your temper and voiced anger?

Anger sends messages such as, “You’ve offended me.” “I don’t like you.”  Expressing anger tends to generate more anger.

While anger is a natural emotion, mismanagement of anger can have serious consequences.  Anger in the workplace is a problem when it adversely affects co-workers and productivity, or turns into violence and expensive litigation. 

Anger has a negative effect on worker morale, productivity and teamwork. Itcan also result in health problems; angrypeople tend to have more cardio-vascular and stress-related illnesses than calm people.

Do you manage anger well? 

Answer “yes” or “no:” 

1. When angry, I act before thinking.

2. It’s easy for me to forgive.

3. My anger goes away after I explode.

4. I’m rarely angry.

5. I become mad to get what I want.

6. I’m easygoing.

7. I lose control when my anger takes over.

8. When provoked, I think before acting.

9. I need to win arguments.

10. I can calm situations when people are angry with me.

11. I hang on to anger.

12. I’m usually calm and centered.

13. I take anger out on people around me.

14. I know when I’m getting angry.

15. People are out to get me.

Scoring: One point for each “yes” to odd-numbered statements and each “no” to even numbered ones.  Three or less suggests you manage anger well; four to seven suggests you should learn anger management strategies; and eight or higher indicates you need anger management counseling or coaching.

Managing anger

1. Take time out.  Count to 10 before acting. Go to a quiet place and breathe deeply if you’re enraged, or wait a few days to cool down.

Shift gears. Dispel angry energy by performing more mundane, routine aspects of your job.

2. Identify feelings and thoughts. Clarify and objectify the issue. Know why you’re mad. Remind yourself to keep anger in check.

Think. Write down your version of the incident. Take responsibility for your feelings.  Explore ways to resolve the problem. Plan how you’ll communicate your view.

3. Communicate. Share your thoughts and feelings with the person. Discuss the factual basis of each other’s thoughts to get a different interpretation. Give merit to another’s view until you can validate its accuracy. Change your view if new information proves you wrong.

Listen. Conflict accelerates when people don’t feel heard. Consider others’ viewpoints carefully without defensiveness. Try to understand the message even if you disagree. Attend to words, tone of voice, expressions and gestures. React thoughtfully. Pay attention to what is said without interrupting, judging or offering solutions. Ask questions when you’re not clear about something. This enables you to get more information and demonstrates interest and concern.

Summarize what you hear the person say to correct misunderstandings. Let her know you hear the emotional content of the message. Listen between the lines. What’s the person feeling but not saying.

When there’s a pause, demonstrate understanding. For example, “I understand.” You’re not necessarily agreeing with the person or giving in, but you’re showing interest and respect the other’s concern.

4. Share negative emotions in person. Never criticize, complain, or send inflammatory remarks via emails, answering machines or notes.

Don’t respond negatively to inflammatory mail. Question your assumptions for validity. Contact senders by phone or email to schedule one-to-one meetings in person or over the phone to discuss concerns.

5. Negotiate. Look for creative compromises that consider needs and priorities of all parties.  Ask those involved for suggestions. Choices make people feel they have control.

6. Forgive. Release negative feelings, the painful past and need for revenge. Search for positive solutions.

7. Practice makes perfect. Identify someone who handles anger well. List three effective anger management strategies he or she uses. List three ways you usually express anger, and three ways in which you could react more positively.

Rehearse anger management strategies.Practicing self-control will enable you to remain calm when tension is high.  You’ll also become a better communicator, maintain fairness and integrity, and have a more harmonious, productive workplace.

Review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts/ and Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, speaker, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with diverse individuals and organizations.  Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential. She is available for consultations and interviews.

Contact: Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

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Are You a #RiskTaker?

July 2, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhD


Can You Take A Risk?

Most successful people have learned to risk. The good feelings that result from taking a risk can be incredible. You see yourself as a survivor. You force yourself to grow by calling on abilities you haven’t used. Achieving your goal will enhance your sense of accomplishment, self-confidence and knowledge.

Are You a Risk Taker?

Answer “yes” or “no.”

1. I often wish people would be more definite.

2. When I want something, I’ll go out on a limb for it.

3. If the possible reward is very high, I would put money into a business that could fail.

4. I like to plan my activities.

5. I enjoy taking risks.

6. I prefer job challenge to job security.

7. I enjoy working on problems that have ambiguous answers.

8. I accept the possibility of failure.

9. It bothers me when something unexpected interrupts my routine.

10. I trust decisions I make spontaneously.

11. In games, I usually go for broke.

12. Once my mind is made up, that’s it.

13. I’m in favor of very strict enforcement of laws regardless of the consequences.

14. I try to avoid situations that have uncertain outcomes.

15. I would not borrow money for a business deal even if it might be profitable.

Scoring: 2 points for responding “yes” to each of the following statements: 2, 3, 5, 6,  7, 8, 10, and 11.

A score of 10 or higher, suggests you enjoy taking risks. You are autonomous, like challenge, are confident, flexible and open to new experiences. However, if your score is 14 or more, your desire to risk may sometimes be extreme. A score of 4 to 8 suggests you may be open to some new experiences, but are overly organized or rigid in other areas. If you scored 3 or lower, you prefer a secure, well-ordered lifestyle.

Strengthen ability to risk.

If you want to develop your full potential, learn to take planned risks. Try some of the following:

— Make small changes first. This enables you to develop confidence and trust. You can then move on to more major decisions. Experiment with a different hair style or food. Change your routine. At work, offer new ways of tackling a job.

— Have a goal. A risk without a clear purpose can backfire. Focus on things you can change.  Have positive expectations, do your homework, know the pros and cons, and listen to your intuition.

— Believe in yourself. Affirm yourself. Replace any negative thoughts or statements with positive ones. Avoid phrases such as, “I can’t,” “I will never. …”

— Turn failure or crises into growth opportunities. Consider “failure” a temporary setback. Depersonalize setbacks. Learn from these. Ask yourself what you would do differently and then make the necessary modifications.

— Look upon something new as an exciting opportunity to challenge yourself andto grow. If you don’t try, how will you ever find out if you can do it?

— Balance tentativeness with commitment. Set goals but don’t write these in stone. Be open to new experiences.

— Establish a support group. Confide in and ask for help from supportive family or friends. Associate with positive people.

— Describe barriers that are blocking you from making a desired change. For example, Personal Barriers include fear of loss of a secure income; fear of failure (such as starting a new job); fear of what others will think; fear of success; and guilt that change might create family hardships.

Societal Barriers include old notions of “career”; outdated retirement policies; traditional gender roles; and blocks imposed by educational institutions, unions and professional associations.

— Complete the Fantasy Risk Exercise: Think of an important risk you would like to take.  What appeals to you about taking this risk? What would you gain?  What is frightening about this risk? What will you lose?  What’s the worst thing that could happen if it turned out badly? If the worst happened, what would you do?

Where could you get information to pursue this risk? From whom could you get support? What could you do to make this less risky? Less irreversible? 

If you broke the risk into small steps, what would the first step be? How soon could you take it? Do this for each step. Evaluate the outcome of the risk. Did it turn out as expected? If not, why? What have you learned?

Celebrate your success whether or not it turned out as expected. Gradually, you will see yourself as a risk taker.

Creating a life worth living and finding the courage to risk pursuing you dreams isn’t easy, but you can do it! Questers, described in award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, show you how! http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963    

Check audible Questers:  https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist,  speaker, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier, who has worked with clients representing varied industries, is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.  Dr. Kanchier is available for consultations and speaking engagements.
Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com
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Are You #Materialistic?

June 30, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhD  

Are You Materialistic?

Do the things you own end up owning you?

Materialistic people attach a lot of importance to money and want to possess many material things. According to experts, consumer materialism seems to be growing in Western cultures.

Numerous studies show that a focus on acquiring stuff makes us unhappy, hurts our relationships, increases our feelings of isolation and self-doubt, causes us to be less resilient in crises, and makes us more prone to mental illness. Research also shows that excessive focus on material possessions lessens citizenship and our sense of social responsibility.  Craving stuff is bad for everybody!

Do you care about material possessions a little too much? Do they make you feel better or more complete? It’s okay, we all love a brand new gadget, outfit, car, home or even holiday. These things are part of who we are. But should they make us who we are?

Are you materialistic?

Answer yes or no.

1. Do you prefer to de-stress by going to the mall to shop for new stuff?

2. Does obtaining a new electronic gadget before others give you immense joy?

3. Do you equate happiness with luxuries in life?

4. Do you believe in showing off your expensive gadgets and clothes whenever you can?

5. Would you buy an expensive brand even when a cheaper, equally good alternative is available?

6. Do you buy latest models of gadgets or appliances even if your old ones work perfectly?

7. Do you feel envy when your friend buys something better than what you already own?

8. Do you always wonder about what others think about you?

9. Do you value social status and prestige over the need to express creativity?

10. Do you think money can solve all your problems and make you happier?

11. Do you look for jobs that pay the highest wages?

12. Do you prefer to make friends only with rich people?

13. Is the first thing you want to know about a blind date the amount of money he or she is making per month?

Scoring: Onepoint for yes to the forgoing statements. The higher your score, the more materialistic you appear to be.

Real happiness comes through knowing that we’re more than just the sum of our stuff. Sadly, due to our societal economic model, that requires money to buy the basics, we can’t help but be materialistic to some degree. Although the bare minimum doesn’t do much for the ego, the preoccupation with acquiring material goods can come at the cost of  developing the spiritual and other aspects of our lives.

Minimizing materialism

Reducing materialism doesn’t mean forsaking all your possessions. A person who has developed a healthy inner world would see possessions as neutral. This shift is more about attitude than specific actions. Try some of the following:

– Track your exposure to advertising. List every ad you’re exposed to for five days. Note the effect the advertising has on your values and habits.

– Clarify your values. Review perks you want your job to provide. The Job Satisfaction Questionnaire in Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life may be helpful. (https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963) Note what you can do to make your job more satisfying.

Separate your identity from the things you possess. You are more than your stuff.

– Monitor spending. Track every penny you spend for a month, and then take a hard look at whether your spending reflects your values. If it doesn’t, think about what’s driving you to behave as you do. Is it insecurity? the need to impress? peer pressure?

– Identify activities that can help fill internal voids in your life. For example, can any of the following fill the void better than possessions: intimate relationship, creative work activities, service to others, spiritual growth?

– List small things that give you great pleasure. Sprinkle them throughout your day. Notice other small pleasures as you proceed through the day.

– Practice random acts of kindness and compassion. Do it anonymously. Help those in need. Volunteer. Make someone smile. Shifting your focus onto the needs of others can replace materialism.

– Experience your relationships. Participate in mutually enjoyable activities things with your partner and friends. Don’t view relationships as possessions.

– Identify intangible assets that can replace your need for material stuff.  Discipline and emotional control are examples of non materialist assets you can strengthen.

– Avoid the status game. Seek friends from all societal levels. Don’t buy into the game that decides a person’s worth is based on their money or profession.

List things for which you’re grateful. Give thanks for them daily. 

– Monitor urges. When you’re at a store, keep track of the number of times you want to buy something.  List these in a  notebook or index card. When you’re aware of purchasing urges, you can better control them.

– Create a monthly shopping list. If you really want to buy something, put it on a list, and write down the date you added the item to the list. Tell yourself you cannot buy that item for a month. When the month has passed, if you still want the item, buy it. But do not buy anything (besides essentials like groceries) without putting it on the list for a month first. Many times, our urges to buy material stuff will pass during this waiting period.

– Declutter. Go through your closets and other possessions and get rid of stuff you don’t use. You may be less likely to buy more stuff, particularly if you like the decluttered look of your home.

– Enjoy varied leisure activities. Exercise, play board games, or create a collage. Do fun things with your own kids, or volunteer for a charity. List 50 free or cheap activities.

– Buy used. When you get the urge to buy something, and you’re convinced that it’s needed, try buying a used item instead of buying a new one, first. Look in thrift shops, garage sales or flea markets.

– Subscribe to ethical principles. Ethics, described as a moral philosophy, is concerned with what is good for individuals and society. Ethics covers the following dilemmas: how to live a good life, our rights and responsibilities, the language of right and wrong, and moral decisions regarding what is good and bad. Our ethical beliefs infuse debates on topics like human rights and professional conduct.

– Let go. Buddhism teaches that attachment to things creates suffering. This doesn’t mean the only path to true happiness is abandoning everything. It means, don’t hold on too tightly to material possessions and relationships.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Carole Kanchier, suggests additional ways to minimize materialism. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963.

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Based on ongoing research, Questers helps people understand change, and empower themselves to manage uncertainty.

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, educator, speaker, registered psychologist/coach, and author of award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life and forthcoming Arouse the Force Within You!  Dr. Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz and University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Carole Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.
 
Dr. Kanchier is available for presentations and consultations. 
Contact: carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com
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Wondering what to do?

June 29, 2020
 
Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

       Are you wondering what to do with life?

·       Wish you could understand and control your life career?
·       Want to adapt and succeed in changing times?
·       Feel empty, stymid?
·       Know something is missing but can't put your finger on it?

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life shows how to take charge of lifelong career https//www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963″

 

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#JobSearch #Mistakes

June 29, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Common Job Search Mistakes

Mailynn was disappointed to learn she didn’t get the position she wanted.  Have you ever been passed over for a job? Do you know why?

Applicants don’t get jobs because they lack required skills. Poor people chemistry, partisan politics and certain behaviors are other reasons. Do you have behaviors that ”turn off” employers? Do you make any of the following common mistakes?

– Lack clear job goals

– Lack accomplishments to support skills claimed

– Don’t prepare for interviews

– Excessive interest in financial rewards

– Lack social poise

– Make little eye contact

– Lack communication skills

– Have poor posture

– No enthusiasm

– Lack initiative

– Belittle previous employers

– Unrealistic expectations

– Make excuses for poor work records

– Ask no or poor questions about the organization and job responsibilities?

– Arrive late for interviews

– Have a “What can you do for me?”attitude

Effective Job Search Strategies

— Show you’re knowledgeable about the company and its needs. Research the organization and job. Call contacts to get an insider’s perspective. Be conversant with the company’s product and services, and recent developments in the industry. Know how to describe contributions you can make. Identify and contact hiring managers.

 —  Prepare several resumes. Target each one to a specific job.  Demonstrate how your experience, skills and accomplishments fit the job and company.

Prepare a scannable resume. Use dashes instead of bullets. Avoid fancy treatments such as italics, underlining and graphics. Employ key words listed in ads to define your skills, accomplishments and other strengths. Include numbers, dollars and evidence of quality.

Send résumés by e-mail correctly. Write your résumé in Microsoft Word. Cut and paste the text of the résumé into the body of the e-mail instead of, or in addition to, sending it as an attachment. (Some recipients fear opening unsolicited attachments). When sending your résumé as an attachment, save it in Rich Text Format (.rtf) instead of as a Word Document to reduce cross-platform compatibility problems.

— Write a short, courteous cover letter.  In three or four paragraphs, identify your job objective, highlight related accomplishments, and indicate how you can benefit the employer. Consider including a portfolio with sample accomplishments, publications or other achievements.

Think about sending an email “teaser” letter with similar content to the regular cover letter. But instead of sending a resume, ask for permission to send it.

— Prepare for interview questions. Practice delivery.  Know the names and titles of all interviewers. Answer questions promptly, offering concrete examples. Show how your skills and accomplishments can do the job. Use success stories to illustrate behaviors.  Emphasize results. Give data indicating positive results you’ve achieved, such as sales increased by fifteen percent over the previous year.

Prepare to answer the following key questions: Tell me about yourself? What are your long-range goals? Why should we hire you? What are your major strengths? Weaknesses? What salary do you expect? How does your previous experience relate to this job? Why do you want this job? Why did you leave your last job?

Turn weaknesses into strengths. If you don’t have a ready response, ask for time to think about it. Don’t respond with one-or two-word answers, interrupt or talk too much. Never discuss salary until you’re offered the job. If pressed, give a range, based on current salary in your field.

— Present a professional demeanor. Wear the team uniform. This shows you belong in the environment. Research the norm for the area, industry and company.  Coordinate pieces. Clothes should be spotless, well-tailored. Hair should be professionally styled, nails well-kept. Avoid strong fragrances.

Radiate energy, enthusiasm, confidence and competence. Be positive, genuine.  A sincere smile displays good will, friendliness. Show interest in the person or project. Keep hands out-of-pockets.  Maintain eye contact with everyone and develop a firm handshake.

— Leave with a favorable impression. If employers like you, they may create a job for you even though you don’t fit the skill set of an advertised position.

Close the interview emphasizing key skills and why you should be hired. Never refuse an offer on the spot. Follow-up each interview or mailed resume with a call. Send thank-you notes to interviewers within 24 hours after interviews.

Don’t take rejection personally. If one job doesn’t materialize, believe you’ll get a better one. Be patient. Maintain optimism, persist.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Carole Kanchier, PhD, will help you clarify life career goals, and develop a master plan for moving forward. Get a copy of Questers Dare to Change at AMAZON –  https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/15r-Life/dp/08408963  

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with clients representing many disciplines. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Carole is available for media interviews and personal consultations.

 
Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com
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© Carole Kanchier, PhDJ

Use Intuition for Career Decision Making

The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.  Albert Einstein

Carole Kanchier

Carole Kanchier, Author, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

Pat, a grade six teacher, is wondering whether to accept the promotion to principal. Carter, a construction manager, wants a job that will enable him to use his digital skills. Recently laid off, Barbara thinks this might be a good time to start her own business. Ben, an engineer, is exploring different fields where he may be able to use his engineering skills.
 
Intuition is a great tool to use in solving varied career and personal challenges. Sigmund Freud’s advice is legendary. “When making a decision … in vital matters … such as the choice of a mate or a profession, the decision should come from the unconscious, from somewhere within ourselves.”

 
Individuals who make wise career decisions combine intuitive strengths with intellect. Trust and value your intuition.  Recognize that you do have the capacity to tap into it. Intend to develop it. Believe you’ll get the required information.
 
Practice relaxation. Relaxing the body allows you to relax the mind. This enables you to slow your brain wave frequency allowing the subconscious mind to function more actively.
 
Find a regular time and place to be alone so that inner signals can be heard. Release negative thoughts and feelings which block energy. Make yourself talk positive. Replace negative thoughts with more positive statements or pictures.
 
Meditate to get into a deeper state of awareness where answers will come more easily. You can meditate on any object, a candle flame, a mantra, a nonsense phrase or even your name.
 
Because intuition connects to a vast data base, it needs concise direction to retrieve a specific answer. For example, Eleanor was wondering whether she should relocate to southern California to join her fiancee. Instead of asking, “Should I relocate?” she asked, “Should I relocate to southern California?” When she received a yes response, she asked for additional information, “Should I move next spring or summer?”
 
Intuitive Problem Solving Techniques
 
– Program Your Dreams. Tell yourself, “I want to have a dream that will contain ……… information to solve a specific problem….I will have such a dream, remember it and understand it.”  Dreams usually come to us in language or symbols we can understand. Examine the sequence of events, how you felt upon awakening how the dream ended. Note the internal and external cues you receive the next day such hearing some news on the radio while driving to work.
 
–  Draw or Doodle. Write out a question that clearly states what you want to know. Underneath your question draw whatever comes to your mind or flows through your hands. Draw until you have nothing to add. Look at the meaning behind the drawing and the symbols within it. Note the sequence of steps. Pay attention to your thoughts and feelings as you look at the picture.
 
– Exercise. Pose a question to your intuition before any kind of physical activity. Then focus on your activity. Pay attention to the various cues that appear during and after the exercise.
 
– Make a Dream Inventory.  Spend about 40 minutes writing down all the things you want to do, have, be and share as quickly as possible. Create the people, feelings and places you want. Everything is possible. Ignore security or financial considerations. Identify major themes that emerge.
 
– Program a Successful Day. Relax on your bed after awakening in the morning. Visualize your entire day on a mental screen. Put a clock on the screen and mentally move the clock forward each hour to the end of the day. Play a mental movie illustrating everything moving smoothly and successfully as you desire. Use this technique to rehearse a successful job interview or anything also you desire.
 
–  Keep a Journal. Write your daily thoughts, feelings and hunches.  Pay attention to what you write and how you feel at the time. Note thoughts and feelings that emerge when you finish. Notice how intuitive hunches feel different from calculated ones.
 
– Practice Makes Perfect. The more you listen to and pay attention to your intuition, the more you’ll become aware of it. Take at least five minutes of quiet time every day to listen to your intuition. Ask for help, support, direction, awareness or anything you want an answer to. Have faith it will come.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Carole Kanchier, PhD, will help you clarify life career goals, and develop a master plan for moving forward. Get a copy of Questers Dare to Change: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/15r-Life/dp/08408963  

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Based on ongoing research, Questers helps people understand change, and empower themselves to manage uncertainty.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Carole Kanchier, PhD, will help you clarify life career goals, and develop a master plan for moving forward. Get a copy of Questers Dare to Change: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/15r-Life/dp/08408963  

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with clients representing varied backgrounds.

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

 

Summer-Time to Reexamine Life Career Goals – Plan for Success Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life Shows How www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

 

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

Summer offers us an opportunity for a change of pace. For some, it is travelling away from work. For others, it’s an opportunity to garden, hike in the mountains, or walk along the river,  Others enjoy sipping coffee on chatting with friends on the patio, Still others enjoy reading a book outdoors in a pleasant spot to connect with nature and their spiritual self!

Based on ongoing research, award winning, Questers Dare to Change shows how to empower yourself to manage lifelong personal, career, and spiritual growth.

Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts/ and Carole’s blogs:

Questers Dare to Change answers many questions adults have about lifelong decision making and growth.

 
* Are you a Quester? Check Quester traits with self-scoring quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

* Courage – A crucial skill in changing times

* Develop a lifelong master plan for career success

* Develop a winning mindset

* Turn setbacks into opportunities

* Understand how job dissatisfaction affects health and productivity

* Are you ready for a career shift?

* Overcome fear of failure

* Entry, mastery, and disengagement – Where are you?

* Find your truth – Complete self-scoring quizzes

… And so much more

Carole Kanchier will be delighted to send a complementary PDF

carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, speaker coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Carole is available for speaking engagements and consultations.

Contact: carole@questersdaretochange.com; wwww.questersdaretochange.com/blogQ

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Effective #JobSearch

June 27, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Effective Job Hunting Strategies

Mike has emailed 500 resumes over the past few months, but still has no responses.

Is your search coming up empty? Are you knowledgeable about appropriate job-hunting strategies? Answer True or False.

1. Responding to want ads is a waste of time.

2. Effective job hunters devote many hours to research.

3. You need to sell yourself to get the right job.

4. Executive Recruiter is another name for employment agency.

5. Networking is the best single method of getting a job.

6. Job hunters get about ten interviews for every 100 resumes mailed.

Answers

1. False.  You can improve your chances with creativity and effort.

Browse through all want ads in newspapers and the Internet. Answer ads that appeal to you, if you have most qualifications listed.

In addition to looking at your professional section, peruse other headings. Accounting positions could be listed under accounting as well as construction, education or other.

Identify key words used in the ads. If appropriate, use these key words to describe your skills and accomplishments in your resume.  Include concrete examples.

Call within two weeks to ensure your letter was received and reviewed. Ask how interview candidates will be chosen. State what you can offer. Request an interview.

2. True. Research is often the most neglected part of job search. Effective research can help you identify job possibilities and investigate prospective companies. Research will help you focus and shorten your search.

To identify potential positions, peruse “The Wall Street Journal,” “Business Week” and other business publications. Check Internet sites such as www.careercrossroads.com. Ask members of your contact network. Attend career fairs, trade shows and professional conferences.

Also look for hidden job leads. A newspaper article or television story describing a new product may suggest positions with a new company or expansion of a larger one.

To get information about prospective employers, check directories such as “Rich’s Guide,” “Million Dollar Directory,”  “Moody’s Complete Corporate Index,” Internet sites and personal contacts.

3. True. Think of yourself as a product to be marketed. Polish your total presentation. Dress professionally. Radiate optimism. Be positive and direct in your written and oral communication. Appear comfortable with your accomplishments and confident about your future.

Develop a portfolio to document your accomplishments. Share these with company interviewers. Include letters of recommendation from customers, commendations from superiors, company awards, and projects and professional seminars completed.

4. False. Search firms, often called executive recruiters or “headhunters,” represent employers, not job seekers. Recruiters often specialize in certain kinds of jobs, such as engineering or senior management.

If you’re conducting a national search for a senior level position, with a company employing more than 500 people, register with headhunters. But since your chances of getting a position this way are slim, use other search strategies.

Don’t deal with firms that want a fee. For information about recruiters, consult the Directory of Executive Recruiters or the Yellow Pages.

5. True. Networking is the best way to get a job. It enables you to increase your contacts and gives useful information, such as what unadvertised positions are available and what companies are hiring. Eighty to eighty-five percent of all employment comes from this method.

List everybody you know who might help you find employment. Keep abreast of new developments in your field and add to your contact list by joining professional, trade, alumni or civic groups. Create ways to meet people who are in hiring positions. Ask for introductions. Make cold calls.

6. False. Two to five for every 100 is more likely. Although direct mail (newspaper or electronic) is not productive  for most, you can make it work for you.

Identify and contact the hiring managers in companies of interest. You may uncover opportunities that won’t be advertised. Show, in your letter and resume, that you have the qualifications for a particular job. List your accomplishments that best relate to the targeted position, and request an interview. Follow up with a phone call.

Don’t be discouraged by rejections. They’re normal. Persevere. If you miss one opportunity, believe you’ll get a better one. Maintain confidence. Have faith.

Award winning, Questers Dare to Change https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963 shows how reassess life career goals and plan for success.   

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist,  speaker,coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Carole is available for consultations and presentations.

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com
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#Flow with #Change

June 25, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Questers Dare to Change Shows How

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/15r-Life/dp/08408963

Is the current pandemic influencing your personal and professional life? Do you fear losing your job, status, security?  Are you afraid of a poor boss, higher workload? Do you manage change well?

Questers who adapt to change:

  • Are self-reliant, resilient, flexible
  • Like learning, challenge
  • Value growth over security
  • Adapt quickly to new situations
  • Like trying new things
  • Handle stress well.

People who are less adaptable:

  • Like stability, structure, predictability
  • Are cautious, dislike fast-paced environments
  • Dislike variety
  • Are bothered when something interrupts routine
  • Are frustrated with time pressures
  • Do things the same way.

You can strengthen Quester traits to manage change

1. Accept and come to terms with change. Understand the five emotional stages of the change process: shock, denial and disbelief; fear and anxiety; resistance, anger and blame; acceptance and exploration; and commitment to action.

Express feelings. Discuss your concerns, fears and plans with a trusted friend. Dispel anger. Write down negative thoughts and feelingsindicating why you feel this way. Note your explanations. When they’re pessimistic, dispute them. Use evidence, alternatives, implications and usefulness as guides.

Identify and overcome obstacles. Clarify what you fear losing. Barriers could include fear of failing in a new job or guilt that change might create family hardships. Describe ways to minimize these.  

2. Empower yourself. Although you can’t control outcomes of external events, you can control your attitudes and beliefs. View change as a growth opportunity.

Change perceptions. A major stressor is how you see threats to your well-being, and the perception you can’t cope, don’t have options. Since your perceptual bias is learned, it can be unlearned. Believe you’ll succeed

Identify opportunities created by change. Focus on improvements resulting from change. Find ways to contribute to the team/department.

– Take responsibility for learning.  Make the job a learning laboratory. Challenge yourself.Learn and experiment with something new, rather than previously mastered tasks. Acquire knowledge/skills in your field, but also expose yourself to information outside your specialty. Surround yourself with diverse stimuli.  Every day, do something to improve yourself.

– Maintain optimism. Reinforce the positive in yourself and others. Associate with positive people. Expect good things. Watch your self-talk. Replace negative statements with positive ones. Emotionally believe you can control situations. Keep a diary of each day’s good experiences.

– Care for your mind, body, emotions and spirit. Schedule quiet times to think, reassess. Practice stress relievers such as deep breathing, exercise, meditation. Eat healthy, get sufficient sleep.

Choose productive attitudes and behaviors. Identify people, places, activities and conditions that both revitalize and drain you.  Each month, pursue one revitalizing activity and eliminate one depleting activity.

– Build confidence. Acknowledge your accomplishments. Post a list of achievements and positive personality characteristics where you can read it daily. Don’t change for others, or compare yourself with others. Don’t dwell on past mistakes. State affirmations daily.

 Enhance creativity. Relax.Brainstorm ways to manage specific changes. Change routines; for example, write with your non-dominant hand.   Keep your sense of humor. Create a journal of cartoons depicting workplace humor.  Look for humor in negative experiences.  Play.

Perceive patterns, and make connections between seemingly unrelated ideas, objects or events. View commonplace things in new ways.  Take advantage of unexpected opportunities.  

–  Develop the will to risk.  Instead of worrying about failure, think about missed opportunities if you don’t try. Don’t fear mistakes. Ask: “What’s the worst that could happen?” Reduce negative outcomes.

Live in the present. Let go of attachments. The more attached you are to something, the greater the fear of losing it.

3. Manage your own career. Clarify your goal and commit to achieving it. Base it on your mission, needs and talents. When possible, create new opportunities. Today’s organizations need your creativity to maintain a competitive edge. Convey what you can contribute to superiors to demonstrate a win/win situation.

Explore ways to creatively redesign your job.Participate in cross-functional teams to get exposure to new functional areas and enrich your position. Recognize other company positions. Consider downward, lateral, regional moves. Anticipate changes. Read newsletters. Network.  

Prepare for, and welcome the unexpected. You can choose to change your attitudes and situation, or you can complain. Use your power!

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Dr. Carole Kanchier, provides additional tips for flowing with change.

 https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/15r-Life/dp/08408963   Chapter 1, Questers Dare to Change, is available from Dr. Kanchier’s web site: www.questersdaretochange.com 

Check audio edition: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1 

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with clients representing many disciplines. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Contact Carole for consultations and speaking engagements — carole@dare to change.com

 
Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com
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