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The Fall Equinox

September 22, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhDT

The Fall or Autumn Equinox, September 22, is one of two days in the year where the sun is directly above the equator. This means that day and night are the same length.

The Autumn Equinox isn’t a daylong event but occurs the moment the sun crosses the celestial equator — that’s at 9:31 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time.

This equinox marks the end of summer, when the days are longer than the nights, and the beginning of fall, when the days become shorter, and nights longer.

The Fall Equinox officially ushers in the new season and its promise of crisp air, show-stopping leaf displays, and cool evenings just perfect for sitting around a fire pit and spinning stories.

Ways to Celebrate the Fall Equinox

Pick apples. The Fall Equinox is a time of harvest. In olden days, it marked the final harvest of the year before villagers hunkered down with what they could pickle and can. So, apple-picking or any other orchard endeavor nearby would be a great way to partake in a “harvest” and give thanks to Mother Earth’s bounty

Award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life is a goodm”https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963″>https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963.

Based on Carole Kanchier’s ongoing research with thousands of adults, Questers Dare to Change redefines careers and work, and shows how “Questers” prevail in turbulent times.

Please request a pdf review copy; Questers Dare to Change:

Carole would love to share experiences on the life career quest with you.

Carole

Carole Kanchier, PhD
Registered Psychologist, Educator, Newspaper/Digital Columnist

Author, Questers Dare to Change https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07VVF5TX1/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_MNttFbNBAZ4ZQ

Blog: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Ph: +1 (403) 695-9770:
Email: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com



5. Perform this three-part Mabon ritual The Fall Equinox is known as Mabon in the Wiccan Wheel of the Year and in other witchy and pagan circles. In my research of Mabon, I came across a lovely ritual that I can’t wait to perform on or around the Fall Equinox

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3

– Recognize burnout is preventable, treatable, and a catalyst for growth.

– Respect yourself, establish your own standards of excellence, and do something challenging each day.

– Manage time, develop supportive relationships, and lead a balanced life.

Review additional suggestions in award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life which redefines lifelong career decisions making. Paperback edition: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

 Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with clients representing many disciplines. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 
 Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com
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Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will.  Mahatma Gandhi

Self-discipline is the ability to make yourself do the things you know you ought to do, without someone making you do them.  It requires ability to control oneself and determine one’s actions, displaying self-control within and without to attain desired goals.

Self-discipline is the key trait needed to attain desired goals, and lead a healthy, happy life. Self-discipline begets sustainable, long term success in all aspects of life: diet, fitness, work, and relationships.

Research suggests people with high self control are happier and healthier than those without self control. They do not allow choices to be dictated by impulses or feelings.

Self-Discipline Tips

1. Wake up early and make your bed every morning. This sets the tone and the pattern of discipline for the rest of the day.

2. Know limitations. We all have limitations  — whether they’re snacking on potato chips or watching video games. Acknowledge shortcomings. You can minimize these.

3. Remove temptations. ”Out of sight out of mind.” This phrase offers powerful advice.  By removing big temptations from your environment you will improve self-discipline. If you want to eat healthy, don’t buy junk food.

4. Exercise. Do something physical. This gives momentum in the right direction.

5. Create a to-do list and complete tasks. Write your list the night before; then follow-up next day.

6. Don’t allow preconceived ideas get in the way of attaining desired goals. If speaking before a group is uncomfortable, find opportunities to practice speaking before friends

 7. Set clear goals and outline an execution plan. Have a clear vision of what you want to accomplish. Proper visualization by the exercise of concentration and willpower enables you to materialize thoughts, not only as dreams or visions in the mental realm but also as experiences in the material.

Break the goal down to small, doable steps. Set yourself a standard and adhere to it. Create a mantra to maintain focus.

8. Be gentle with yourself. Realize everyone experiences setbacks as they work toward goals. View setbacks as learning experiences as you work toward your goal.

9. Watch “self-talk.” Each time you catch yourself saying something that fuels lack of confidence, say “cancel,” and replace it with a more positive statement. Shift your vocabulary from being a victim to someone with power and strength.

10. Track progress. Write the action you want to accomplish daily (make your bed, read a chapter of a book, journal, exercise, call a friend, complete to-do list, etc.) and check the statement date when you’ve completed action.

Work hard. Persist.  If you want to transform your life in a positive way, make it happen. Put in the hours, the days, the weeks, and the months to accomplish desired goals. Get on the path to a better you, and stay on the path. The road requires discipline and action. Desired outcomes follow.

Expand horizons. Go beyond borders. Prepare for and welcome the unexpected. Innovate, adapt, explore, seize opportunities. Nothing is beyond reach!

Follow the examples of Questers in “Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life: http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/150840896

 Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD,is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach, and speaker. Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, other institutions of higher learning, and consults with organizations globally. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

MARCH 30, 2020

WHATS NEXT FOR YOU?

Are you stuck at home wondering what to do next?                                                                      

Use your time constructively to learn more about yourself and set perdoan;andprofessionalgoalsfrwhentings becmemore notmal

 goals fo what you want todowhen thingsmive backtonorml.

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@questersdaretochange.com

 yoursel and consider plsnnin your ext mve athe birus clear and thinsg move back tonotml

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@questersdaretochange.com

OCT 7B, 2019

Mastering Self Discipline

“Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will.”Mahatma Gand

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Are Work Habits Holding You Back?

Are your work habits holding you back? Are you aware of your bad habits? Are you settling for less than your best?

Habits are acquired behavior patterns regularly followed until they become involuntary. You may not be aware of some habits because they’re made without thinking. However, superiors and clients will catch them.

Fall is perfect time to make changes that will advance your career. Here are common bad habits and tips to eliminate them.

Good and Bad Habits

-Bad habit – Abusing time  

Good habit:  Manage time. Get up an hour earlier to think and plan. Review daily work activities to identify self-defeating habits such as underestimating time needed for tasks. Make a to-do list and prioritize tasks. Don’t try to do too much at once. Break big jobs into smaller, manageable tasks. Allow for the unexpected. Consult your schedule often and re-prioritize tasks as necessary to ensure you deliver commitments.

– Bad habit -Fearing failure

Good habit: View mistakes as opportunities. Failure is a powerful teacher.  Ask yourself: “Why did the mistake occur?”What elements were responsible?” “How can I avoid similar mistakes in the future?” If you make the same mistake twice, put the lesson in writing. Place the questions and answers where you’ll be reminded not to repeat steps which led to the error.  Measure success by how quickly you recover from mistakes.If you accept setbacks, you’ll continue to grow.

Bad habit – Criticizing co-workers

Good habit:: When you give colleagues feedback, be constructive. Offer suggestions. Don’t hover or nitpick. Resist the urge to offer advice on non-essential matters.

-Bad habit -Staying in a rut

Good habit:  Reevaluate your career goals and progress. Can your current position help you attain desired goals? If not, think of other more satisfying possibilities. Explore options in your company and field as well as different fields. Consider moving down the corporate ladder. Explore lateral positions or creatively redesign your job. Think about self employment, relocating and retraining. Devise a plan for attaining your goal.

-Bad habit – Adhering to old notions of career advancement

Good habit:: Reevaluate your definition of career development. View career growth as a lifelong process of personal and professional development — a continuing quest to maintain harmony between who you are and what you do.  Select an occupation that is congruent with your personal qualities rather than to please others or for the myth of security.

Bad habit –  Failing to maintain a healthy lifestyle

Good habit:: Find time for yourself. Work is just one component of a happy and productive life. Identify activities that would bring peace and satisfaction to your life (relationship, hobby, spiritual practices or volunteer activity). Reward your successes.

-Bad habit -Using company computer for personal matters
Good habit:  Work on personal projectsat home or during the lunch hour. Focus on tasks for which you get paid during business hours.

-Bad habit -Sending useless e-mails

Good habit:: Send relevant information only and ensure that the message content is clear. Verify each message answers the “5 Ws” (who, what, when, where, why).

-Bad habit -Practicing poor business etiquette

Good habit: Present a professional, confident image. Consider others’ feelings. Be respectful and considerate to everyone. Practice such basic courtesies as returning messages promptly,leaving concise voice mail messages,sending hand written thank you notes and greeting people when entering an office.

-Bad habit -Interrupting others

Good habit:: Value others’ opinions. Listen when they speak. Offer your opinion after people have spoken. Ask questions when you’re not clear about something. Summarize what you hear people say to correct misunderstandings. Let others know you hear what they’re feeling but not saying.

-Bad habit – Failing to give feedback and recognition

Good habit:: Let others know you appreciate their efforts or accomplishments. Feedback and praise are most effective when offered immediately and linked to specific activities, products or attributes.

-Bad habit – Abusing company expense accounts
Good habit:  Apply the same smart frugality that you use in your personal life to business expenses.  Save the company money and you will be recognized for it.

-Bad habit -Being impatient with clients

Good habit:: Value customer service. List reasons why customers are important to the business. Take a refresher course in customer service offered by your company or local college.

-Bad habit – Stealing company products

Good habit:: Don’t take products such as office supplies that belong to the organization for business uses. It’s unlawful, and can cost your professional reputation.

Recognize and eliminate poor habits

List habits that are hampering your career advancement. Ask superiors and colleagues for feedback. (Examples include: not following through on promises, not meeting deadlines, not being a team member, not being flexible, not managing conflict, and sharing personal information.

Each week, replace a bad habit with a more productive behavior. Describe how the good habit will advance your career. Observe successful people. Read. With practice, each new activity will become easier, more automatic. Stay positive, focused. Persist.

Review the many suggestions offered in award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life which redefines lifelong career decisions making. Paperback edition: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

 Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with clients representing many disciplines. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 
 Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com
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Tips for Lifting the Blues

August 31, 2020

The current pandemic is affecting many in numerous ways. We may have difficulty sleeping, concentrating on enjoyable activities, and have reduced or increased appetite.

We may feel sad, have depressed mood. Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest and can interfere with daily functioning.

Experts report that depression is more common than coronary artery disease, cancer or AIDS. It causes greater day-to-day impairment in quality of life than diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis or ulcers.

Depression costs industrialized countries several billion each year in treatments, absenteeism, and lost productivity and wages. Depressive illnesses are becoming a leading cause of disease in developed countries.

Many factors contribute to depression including genetics, poor diet and sleep habits, and food sensitivity. Illnesses and their treatments, drug interactions, improper metabolism and social isolation are other causes.

A family history of depression suggests biological vulnerability. Psychological makeup plays a role. Pessimistic, dependent people with low confidence who are easily overwhelmed by stress, are prone to depression. A major loss (death of a loved one, job termination) and work stress are also linked to depression. 

Symptoms of Depression

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) lists the following criteria for major depression. At least five must be present every day during the same two-week period. Do any of these apply to you?

— Depressed mood most of the day.

— Diminished interest or pleasure in most activities.

— Reduced or increased appetite.

— Insomnia or excessive sleeping.

— Extreme restlessness or lethargy.

— Fatigue or loss of energy.

— Feelings of worthlessness, guilt, hopelessness or pessimism.

— Diminished ability to think, concentrate or make decisions.

— Recurrent thoughts of death or suicide.

— Irritability or excessive crying.

Although five of the foregoing suggest severe depression, take action if you checked any criterion.

Tips for managing depression

Seek professional assistance. Getting help is not a sign of weakness. Mental and medical health specialists, who practice in community health centers, hospitals, company EAP programs and private offices, offer evaluation and treatment.

Get a thorough medical examination to rule out health causes. If you have severe or chronic depression caused by a chemical imbalance, medications will be prescribed to alter brain chemical action and improve mood, sleep, appetite, energy level and concentration.

Talking with a trained counselor or psychologist can be effective in treating less severe or non chronic depression. Therapy can be helpful alone or used in combination with medication.

Sometimes, it is helpful to discuss certain work problems with a supervisor or co-workers. Focus on improving the situations, not personalities, and end talks on a positive note.

Recognize and change negative thoughts and behaviorsNegative thoughts are often unrealistic, and tend to have a generalized, exaggerated, spiraling quality.

You are what you think.You can choose to dwell on and enlarge mistakes or hurtful feelings which will contribute to depression. Or, you can stop negative thoughts and replace these with more positive, constructive ones.

If your supervisor suggests changing some part of a report, you can think, “I made another mistake. I’m useless . . .” Or, you can monitor negative thoughts, note whether you made similar mistakes before, and replace the irrational, negative belief with a more positive statement. “I haven’t made this mistake before. . .  Now I really know how to improve my reports . . .”

Focus on opportunities, constructive ways of dealing with challenges. Practice positive self-talk. Emotionally believe you can control situations. Listen to motivational quotes during your commute. 

Don’t take customer complaints personally.You’re usually the outlet for their anger and frustration with the company policies, services or products.

– Enhance confidence. Prepare a list of accomplishments and positive personality characteristics. Post this where you can read it daily. Build on accomplishments. Each day, enhance some previous performance.

Think and talk about things you want.Review fortunate experiences in a journal. Note the role belief and hard work played in achieving successes as well as strategies used.

Participate in activities that give pleasure and a sense of accomplishment. Plan enjoyable activities daily. Watch a movie, get a massage, take a class on a topic of interest, join a hiking group.

– Develop meaningful relationships. Associate with positive, supportive people who believe in your abilities. Help others as well as yourself by volunteering for a cause in which you believe.

Join a support group. You may be surprised to learn an evening with a group of depressed people can be enjoyable. Support groups provide a forum for mutual acceptance, understanding and self-discovery.

– Safeguard health. Keep a journal to chart eating and sleeping habits, and enjoyable and stressful activities. Identify factors that may be contributing to depression, and replace these with more positive ones.

Minimize stress by exercising, meditating, engaging in hobbies, and creating a relaxing morning routine. Don’t take work problems home.

– Set realistic, attainable goals. Break large tasks into small, achievable ones. Set priorities.

Postpone major life decisions, such as changing jobs or getting married. Wait until depression lifts.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Dr. Carole Kanchier, offers numerous tips for strengthening healthy personal qualities and moving forward in your life career. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist,  speaker, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and consulted with varied organizations. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.
 
Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com
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Perfect #Memory for #Names

August 16, 2020

Questers Dare to Change Shows How

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

 

Based on Dr. Carole Kanchier’s ongoing research with thousands of adults for over 50 years, award winning, Questers Dare to Change redefines careers and work, and shows how “Questers” perfect their memory for names.

Do you remember people’s names during and after interviews? Do you recall the names of business associates at large gatherings?

Remembering names is an appreciated courtesy you can extend to everyone at work and elsewhere. You’ll gain respect, popularity, and networking skills. You’ll advance your career. Try the following:

1. Mental set. Before attending a meeting where you’llmeet new people, mentally prepare yourself to succeed. Research names and titles of individuals who will be in attendance.

Pause between each introduction. Make eye contact with each person you meet. If possible, repeat the name of each person.

2. Observe. Identify unusual or unique facial characteristics. Notice how this face differs from others. For example, note heavy eyebrows, cleft chin, or defined cheekbones.

Exaggerate this feature to embed it in your memory. Using your imagination, mentally reconstruct the person’s face the way cartoonists do to overstate noteworthy features.

3. Associate. Create an association between that distinguishing characteristic, the face, and the name in your mind. The association may be to link the person with someone you know with the same name, or associate an image with the person’s face or defining feature.

4. Clarify name. If you’re uncertain about a person’s name, politely ask for reiteration. Confirm the correct pronunciation. Consider asking the derivative of an unusual name. This confirms interest and offers repetition. Repeat the name to yourself or aloud. “It’s a pleasure to meet you, Huang.”

5. Repeat and review. When introduced, ask the person to repeat his name. Use the name yourself as often as possible. After you’ve left that person’s company, review the name, and enter it in your business directory. Record the time, place, and date at which you’ve met each new person. Note distinctive information such as hobbies or career history.

During conversations, repeat names wherever possible. This involves people more intimately. Also repeat and spell to yourself names of new acquaintances. When leaving a new associate, reiterate the name.

6. Pace yourself. Don’t rush through introductions. Ensure you’ve made one personal comment to each person you’ve met. Intend to remember one more name than previously at each new meeting.

Memory aids may initially be time-consuming and feel clumsy. But research demonstrate they work. Rehearse the aids with everyone you meet. Enjoy the process.

Author, Dr. Carole Kanchier, career and personal growth expert, is a registered psychologist, coach, speaker and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life: http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963. Dr Kanchier is available for keynotes and consultations.

Contact: carole@daretochange.com;carole@uestersdaretochange.com    

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

OVERCOMING FEAR

Darryl wants to establish his own business, but thinks he’ll deprive his family of their comfortable lifestyle. Kelly wants to return to school, but fears she’ll lose her independence.

What’s stopping you from attaining your goal?

We often hesitate to follow our hearts, because of perceived barriers. To take charge of our lives we need to identify our blocks. Are any of the following stopping you from pursuing dreams?

  • Afraid you can’t find help?
  • Fearful you’ll lose a secure or high income, pension or other benefits?
  • Afraid change will interfere with personal relationships or create family hardships?
  • Frightened of losing power or prestige?
  • Afraid of making a mistake or of being successful?
  • Lack goals?
  • Other?

Managing Fear

Many barriers to growth involve fear. Acknowledge your fears. Fear is a reassuring signal that you’re about to stretch yourself. Fear alerts you to protect yourself from loss.

Underlying most fear is lack of trust in your ability to perform. Some fear is good, instinctual. It alerts you to danger. But continuous fear is destructive, a barrier to growth.

Fear is the result of conditioning. We learn early to be cautious. Parents warn children to “be careful.” This conveys messages that we won’t be able to cope. Because fear is learned, it can be unlearned.

Tips for Managing Fear

– Live in the present. Fear is the acronym for False Expectations Appear Real. Don’t worry about what might happen. Live now. Research your goal, develop an action plan to minimize setbacks, and each day work toward your goal.

– Let go of “attachments.” Since fear usually accompanies the process of “letting go,” the more attached you are to something, the greater the fear of losing it. If you’re attached to a good-paying job, you may fear leaving it for work that promises more growth.

– Know and accept yourself. Know your purpose. Fear results from a discrepancy between your actions and needs. When you’re true to your purpose, you experience harmony and stability. When you ignore your spiritual self, you experience disharmony, indecision and doubt. Work at achieving goals that are compatible with your purpose. Believe you’ll attain them.

– Don’t try to live up to others’ expectations. What do you want? If you’re centered, your personal power will help you achieve your goals. You’ll feel comfortable taking the necessary steps. Money and possessions will often be a by-product.

– See yourself as someone who has choices, takes action, and operates from a position of inner strength. You’re in control and have choices. As your power builds, so will your confidence and risk-taking ability. Not taking action is a choice.

– Watch yourself talk. Keep a log to track the negatives you say. Each time you catch yourself saying something that fuels your fear, replace it with a more positive statement. Think “I can” instead of “I can’t.”

– Form a support group. Associate with people who make you feel good and support your goals.

– Develop the will to risk. Risk taking gets easier with practice. Start with small risks in daily activities. Before going to sleep at night, plan your risk for the next day.

– Live a balanced life. Become involved in varied activities (e.g., relationships, hobbies, spiritual and community activities) to make your life complete. This will enhance your creativity. You may even enjoy a job which was unsatisfying

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Dr. Carole Kanchier, offers additional tips for managing fear: http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963    

Contact Dr. Carole: carole@questersdaretochange.com; Website: www.QuestersDaretoChange.com.

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#Flow with #Change

August 2, 2020

Flow with Change

Many of us spend much of our lives trying to stop or resist change. It’s human nature to be comfortable with the way things are. However, our lives, our growth, and our career advancement are fueled by the dynamics of change.

The energy we spend fighting to keep the status quo is energy we could be using to understand the causes and nature of the changes occurring within and around us.

The ability to take planned risks is just what we need to manage our careers in today’s dynamic world. Without change, there is no growth, no vitality, no joy.

To have a satisfying life, we need to change again, and again, until we have created the best possible lives for ourselves – a life in which we feel comfortable being ourselves, without apology or pretense; a life in which we can be all we want to be!

Award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, shows how to manage change and create a purposeful, fulfilling life: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/ 1508408963.

Check audible edition Review audible ed. https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Get a copy of the paperback edition; Questers Dare to Change:

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts/ and Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Many thanks for considering this invitation to help people change their lives for the better.

Continuing best wishes in your life career!

Carole Kanchier, PhD; carole@questersdaretochange.com

www.questersdaretochange.com

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Questers Dare to Change

Fall is a great time to inspire and inform others how to better their life careers

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life shows how to create desired life career

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

Based on Dr. Carole Kanchier’s ongoing research with thousands of adults for over 50 years, Questers Dare to Change redefines careers and work, and shows how succeed. Questers shows readers how to empower themselves to manage change.

Check your Quester traits: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

Review audible ed. https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Get a copy of the paperback edition; Questers Dare to Change:

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts/ and Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Thanks for showing others how to change their lives for the better.

Carole Kanchier, PhD; carole@questersdaretochange.com

www.questersdaretochange.com

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#Managing #Change

July 31, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.” ~ Charles Darwin

Change happens around us every day. Yet, why do many people fear change?

We get into comfortable ruts! When something takes us out of our comfort zones – job loss, geographic move – we feel uncomfortable because we must adjust to a different situation.

We can learn from adversity or change if we look at lessons with open minds. Winston Churchill said: “A pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees opportunity in every difficulty”.

Eastern thinkers believe everything in life is impermanent. When we accept the fact that nothing lasts forever, we’re equipped to manage changes. Therefore, enjoy good times, and remember challenging times are temporary.

How well do you adapt to change?

Answer yes or no:

1. I’m self-reliant, resilient, flexible

2. I like learning, challenge

3. I like stability, structure, predictability

4. I’m cautious, dislike fast-paced environments

5. I value growth over security

6. I adapt quickly to new situations

7. I dislike variety

8. I’m bothered when something interrupts routine

9. I like trying new things

10. I handle stress well

11. I get frustrated with time pressures

12. I like doing things the same way.

Scoring: 1 point for each yes to 1, 2, 5, 6, 9 and 10; and each no to 3, 4, 7, 8, 11 and 12.

To empower yourself to manage change, consider suggestions below.

Adapting to change

We can learn to respond to change with positive anticipation, believing change brings new opportunities.

View career growth as a lifelong process of personal and professional development – a continuing quest to maintain harmony between who you are and what you do.

– Take responsibility for your career. Create new opportunities with your current or another employer. Consider time out, full or part-time study, travel or self employment.

– Identify personal and transferable skills. These enable you to perform in varied situations. Employers value adaptive skills like openness to ideas, persistence, critical evaluation, enthusiasm, helpfulness, patience, optimism and tolerance.

Strengthen “meta skills.” These skills for tomorrow can’t be easily automated. They include problem solving, research, judgment, inspiration, relationship building, ethical leadership, mental training and emotional intelligence. Continuously update technical and professional skills and strengthen Quester qualities like authenticity, purpose, risk, confidence and resilience.

– Cultivate and use intuition. Intuitive skills help you deal with ambiguous circumstances. Practice relaxation to slow your mind and listen to inner signals. Ask dreams for direction before going to sleep. Keep a journal. Pray. Communicate with nature.

– Continue to learn. Lifelong learning is the ongoing, voluntary, and self-motivated pursuit of knowledge for personal, interpersonal, leisure, health, spiritual or professional reasons. Workshops, online courses, night school, apprenticeship programs, and correspondence school offer programs. Some learning activities are recognized by traditional educational institutions and may be called adult education.

– Think critically. Critical thinkers ask questions, evaluate, categorize, and find relationships. To read critically, ask: What are main points? Can I put this into my own words? Is a bias apparent? Could a different conclusion be drawn? Are ideas supported by evidence? Do I agree with the author? What are implications?

Strengthen creativity. Approach the problem from different angles. Ask for feedback from people with different backgrounds. Avoid negativity. View work differently. What would happen if you shrink, enlarge or change its shape? Surround yourself with diverse stimuli. Seek information outside your specialty. Awaken your child within. Play. Believe anything is possible. Expand your horizons. Go beyond borders. Prepare for and welcome the unexpected. Innovate, adapt, explore, seize opportunities. Nothing is beyond reach!

Follow examples of Questers in Questers Dare to Change —Paper edition: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life. Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with clients representing many disciplines. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

How Well Do You Manage Change?
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