3 Tips for Achieving Goals

September 3, 2019

 3 tips for achieving goals

– Measure success by internal standards.

– Set attainable goals.

– Enjoy process of learning, mastering, attaining.

Award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, provides additional3 tips for advancing life career: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963. Get the audible version of Questers:. …….

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Positive Outlook For Fall

September 1, 2019

Self talk can boost you up or take you down. Athletes use positive self-talk to reach their personal bests. Some people use negative self-talk to justify the ruts they find themselves in. Kirk and Mike are examples.

Kirk an aerospace engineer whose organization was terminating employees kept telling himself and others he will lose his job. Mike, on the other hand, researched options and sent updated resumes to potential employers. Kirk lost his job. Mike was offered a job the day he received his pink slip. When Kirk learned to restructure his thoughts, and updated skills, he attained his desired position.

Is the conversation you have in your head about yourself and the world around you positive, growth-oriented, or negative, constraining?

What does this quiz say about you?
Answer “yes” or “no.”
1. I learn from my mistakes.
2. I’m too old to compete with younger job applicants.
3. I know and accept myself.
4. I prefer the tried and true ways of doing things.
5. Career success is defined personally.
6. I do what I “should” rather than what I want.
7. I welcome criticism as a way to grow.
8. I won’t consider relocating for an attractive job elsewhere.
9. My successes are the result of hard work, determination and some ability.
10. I’ll accept a promotion to a job I don’t think I’ll like for money and prestige..

Scoring: 1 point for each “yes” to odd numbered statements, and each “no” to even numbered ones. The higher your score, the more you possess positive, growth-oriented attitudes. A score of less than 4 suggests your career could benefit from positive self-talk.

Self-Talk Tips
– Reevaluate your definition of career advancement. View career growth as a lifelong process of personal and
professional growth — a continuing quest to maintain harmony between who you are and what you do.

– Know yourself and options. Identify your skills, major accomplishments, needs, purpose and other attributes. Explore options that are compatible with your personal characteristics. Specify your ideal job; include field or industry, title, tasks, type of company and location.

Don’t choose an occupation because experts predict it will be in demand or to please others. Rather, select one that is congruent with your personal qualities. If you follow your heart instead of “shoulds,” money may be a by-product.

– Restructure your thinking to that of creating a job rather than applying for one. Reevaluate your career goals periodically. Modify these as you learn more about yourself and your changing environment. Embrace and grow with change.

– Continue to learn. Welcome opportunities to discover new technologies and enhance transferable skills, such as computer literacy and verbal communication.

– Develop and use intuition. Take quiet time daily to tune into your inner self. Meditate on an object, such as a candle flame or mantra. Ask your dreams for direction before falling asleep sleep. Keep a journal. Communicate with nature.

Create a vision board with pictures of your self living your desired lifestyle so it’s in your vision every single day. Affirmations can be excellent tools to keep you motivated towards attaining your goal. You must bring your desired goal into the present moment and fully, emotionally and positively believe that it can and does exist in your current reality.

– Maintain optimism. Expect good things to happen. Every time you hear your inner voice criticize, stop and think of something positive to say such as “I’m making progress.” Write down things you like about yourself such as “I’m flexible and creative.” Post the list where you can see it often.

– Exhibit flexibility and resilience. If you’ve been blocked from attaining a desired career goal, investigate other ways of achieving it.

– View risk as a learning opportunity. Start with small risks in daily activities. Then proceed to more challenging ones. Think of an important risk you’d like to take. What’s the worst thing that would happen if it turned out badly? Where could you get information and support to make the goal less risky? Break the goal into small steps. When can you take the first step?

– Live in the present. Don’t worry about what might happen. Depersonalize failure. View setbacks as learning experiences. Persist. Have faith that you’ll achieve your goal.

– Start a daily gratitude journal. Thank the universe daily for positive experiences you had each day. Recognize and practice small acts of kindness daily.

Additional strategies for empowering self talk are described in award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

The audible version of Questers Dare to Change is available: The audible Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life shows how to realize potential! https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist and author of Questers Dare to Change. Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz and University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential. www.questersdaretochange.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

For most people, Labor Day means two things: a day off and a chance to say goodbye to the summer. But why is it called Labor Day?

In the United States and Canada, Labor Day, a national holiday, always falls on the first Monday in September. This year (2019) Labor Day is Monday, September 2. Labor Day is also celebrated on this day in Puerto Rico, the Canal Zone, and the Virgin Islands.

The day is set aside to pay tribute to working men and women. Labor Day weekend is also considered the unofficial end of summer.

In European countries, China and other parts of the world, May Day, the first day in May, is a holiday to celebrate workers and labor unions.

Test your knowledge of Labor Day

Respond T (True) or F (False):

1. Labor Day is the affirmation of the dignity and worth of workers.

2. Labor Day began in Canada in 1872, when the Toronto Trades Assembly organised the first significant workers’ demonstration to support exploited workers.

3. In the US, the first Labor Day, held in 1883, stemmed from the desire of the Central Labor Union to create a workers’ holiday.

4. Many view Labor Day as a day of rest, the end of summer, a last chance to make trips or hold outdoor eve

A trade or labor union is an association of workers whose purpose is to improve economic status and working conditions primarily through collective bargaining.

6. The term “closed shop” refers to company that hires only union members.

7. Elton Mayo’s research in the 1930s demonstrated that workers were more motivated by recognition and social interaction than by material rewards.

8. Historically, labor unions developed in response to the need to protect the common interest of workers.

9. In the process of collective bargaining, an employer agrees to discuss working conditions with employee representatives usually a labor union.

Answers

1 True. Labor Day is the affirmation of the dignity and worth of workers. Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of North American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our nations.

2. True. Labor Day began in Canada in 1872, when the Toronto Trades Assembly organised the first significant workers’ demonstration to support exploited workers.

3. True. In the US, the first Labor Day, held in 1883, stemmed from the desire oh the Central Labor Union to create a workers’ holiday.

4. True. Many view Labor Day as a day of rest, the end of summer, a last chance to make trips or hold outdoor events. In some communities, people organize fireworks displays, barbecues and public arts or sports events.

5. True. A trade or labor union is an association of workers whose purpose is to improve economic status and working conditions primarily through collective bargaining

6 True. The term “closed shop” refers to company that hires only union members. A closed shop is a form of union security agreement under which the employer agrees to hire union members only, and employees must remain members of the union at all times in order to remain employed

International Labor covenants do not address the legality of closed shop provisions, leaving the question up to each individual nation. The legal status of closed shop agreements varies widely from country to country, ranging from bans on the agreement, to extensive regulation of the agreement to not mentioning it at all.

7 True. Elton Mayo’s research in the 1930s demonstrated (The Hawthorne Experiments) that workers were more motivated by recognitionnd social interaction than by material rewards. Companies subsequently introduced various incentives to increase employee motivation and productivity.

8 True. The labor movement in the United States grew out of the need to protect the common interest of workers. For those in the industrial sector, organized labor unions fought for better wages, reasonable hours and safer working conditions. The labor movement led efforts to stop child labor, give health benefits and provide aid to workers who were injured or retired

9 True. Collective bargaining is the process in which working people, through their unions, negotiate contracts with their employers to determine their terms of employment, including pay, benefits, hours, leave, job health and safety policies, ways to balance work and family, and more. Collective bargaining is a way to solve workplace problems. It is also the best means for raising wages in America. Indeed, through collective bargaining, working people in unions have higher wages, better benefits and safer workplaces.

Ongoing technological, economic, and social changes are forcing us to continue to reassess our views of the meaning and structure of work. Ways in which we honor the dignity and worth of workers may also be modified.

 Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life describes lifelong career growth, change, and decision making. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Audible Questers is available: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Author, Carole Kanchier is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach, speaker, and author of award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Contact Carole: carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questerdaretochange.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Are you a Quester? Would you like to become one? What are Questers, anyway?

Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

Questers, who have been around for centuries, pursue causes important to them. Many have made significant contributions to humankind. Galilei Galilio, the Italian physicist, proved the earth revolved around the sun; Abraham Lincoln inspired the nation to abolish slavery; Miklhail Gorbachev had courage and character to give up power of soviet communism; Nelson Mandela campaigned for justice and freedom in South Africa, Albert Einstein the scientist campaigned for a peaceful world, Marie Curie was awarded a Nobel Prize for her discoveries with radiation; and Martin Luther King inspired millions to aspire for a more equal society.

Other Questers, from all walks of life, create work in harmony with their purpose. Could you do the same?

My ongoing research on lifelong career decision making, described in audible, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, shares Questers’ success secrets.

https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Questers are authentic, innovative, and have courage to risk. They’re confident, resilient, and value intrinsic rewards such as autonomy and challenge more than external rewards like status and security. Most view failure as learning experiences and measure success personally.

Periodically, they reevaluate goals and make modifications to maintain congruence between who they are and what they do. Career advancement, to them, means growth of the whole person.

Fred studied mechanical engineering because he loved “fixing things.” He created a maintenance position in an apartment complex that enabled him to fix things.

Attuned to changes within and around them, Questers anticipate layoffs. While her colleagues worried about being laid off, Manu upgraded her skills and contacted employers. She was offered a job the day she received the pink slip.

People, who report relatively high scores on Quester traits, tend to have higher job and life satisfaction than those who report lower scores.

We are all born Questers. You see these characteristics in toddlers as they excitedly explore their homes. Unfortunately, as we grow older, we set up barriers to growth which are demonstrated by behaviors like fear, denial, and delay. It is crucial to strengthen our Questers traits to succeed in uncertain times.

Tips for Strengthening Quester Skills

– Clarify purpose. Identify themes: strengths and accomplishments, absorbing childhood activities, recurring dream, what you’d wear to a costume party, people you admire, how you’d spend time if you had billions?

 – Focus on the positive. Look for and expect good things. Each time you catch yourself thinking something negative, replace it with a more positive thought.

– Strengthen resilience. Note what you’ve learned from traumatic experiences. Indicate how these have made you stronger, wiser. Identify early cues that you’ve ignored, and what you’d now do differently.

– Stretch yourself. Read, take courses. Don’t compare yourself with others. Judge your accomplishments against personal standards of self-improvements. Challenge conventional beliefs.

– Be authentic. Do what’s right for you, not what others think. Ensure actions are consistent with thoughts and feelings.

Strengthen courage to risk. Review three successful risks taken. Note what made these successful. Identify perceived barriers for taking another risk, and explore ways to overcome them.

– Manage fear. Identify worrisome issues. Minimize them by researching relevant information and resources. Live in the present. Let go of “attachments.”

– Create a life in which you continue to grow and have choices. Use your Quester power. The audible Questers Dare to Change shows how:

Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist and author of award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Dr. Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions. Her columns have been published in Wall Street Journal, New York Post, San Francisco Chronicle, Vancouver Sun, Toronto Sun, Boston Globe, South Africa National Magazine, Malaysia Business, and Indonesia Inistar. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Contact: carole@questersdaretochange.com; carole@daretochange.com www.questersdaretochange.com.

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 Honesty is more than not lying. It is truth telling, truth speaking, truth living, truth loving.’ James E. Faust

Have you ever lied at work? Do you tell half-truths to get the sale or job? Do you keep promises?

 What does this quiz say about you?

Answer yes or no.

1. I’ve lied on my resume or fudged reports.

2. I call in sick when I’m not.

3. I surf the internet on company time.

4. I fail to disclose pertinent information.

5. I’ve cheated on school or employment tests.

6. I’d tell a face-saving lie to protect my career.

7. I exaggerate the truth or tell white lies to avoid hurting someone.

8. I’ve stolen office supplies or padded expense accounts.

9. I lie to better serve my employer or clients.

10. I’ve copied software or reproduced cassettes.

 Scoring: One point for each “yes.” The higher your score, the more you could enhance honesty.

 Lying is stressful, and stress harms health and accelerates aging. Frequent lying and fear of exposure keeps your body’s “fight or flight” response on. Long term activation of this system may result in health conditions like heart disease.

 The Pinocchio Effect also kicks in when you lie. The temperature in the muscles around the nose becomes hotter, according to Emilio Milán and Elvira López at the University of Granada. There is corresponding action in the insular cortex of the brain which controls emotions. Fear of being caught in a lie increases activity in the insular cortex, leading to more heat emanating from the nose. The researchers called this the Pinocchio effect. In Walt Disney’s Pinocchio, the boy puppet’s lies are revealed whenever his wooden nose grows.

 Lying damages a person’s self respect and credibility. Dishonesty also affects company productivity. Using company time and stealing small items add up. Honest employees pay for others’ lack of integrity through stricter rules, or other..

 Why people lie

Children learn to lie. Many don’t view cheating on exams as unethical. Dishonest behavior is encouraged when schools fail to show disapproval of students’ cheating. The same message is given when parents cheat on taxes. Children learn all methods for achieving goals are justified.

 We fib because we need to appear competent, want to avoid hurt or conflict, desire to protect our jobs, or not rock the boat. Some workers may lie about a sick child to protect themselves from taking another business trip. Others who call in sick are tending to personal needs. Not all supervisors understand employees’ need for family or relaxation time. Business behaviors such as not disclosing pertinent information or selling defective goods are rationalized along the same lines.

Political and business leaders have lied for centuries. Recent studies conducted by Paul Piff, social psychologist, at the University of California, Irvine, found that self-interests tend to spur the elite to lie and cheat.

Lies have hidden costs, not only in productivity and teamwork, but in a person’s self-respect. It’s difficult to stop, once you start exaggerating the truth. People who lie don’t remember who knows what. A major consequence is damaged credibility.

Various workplace situations facilitate untruthful behaviors. Employee dishonesty may be a sign of outdated company policies. Workers may take time off for questionable family needs because the employer has no flex time or personal care days.

 Demonstrating Truthfulness

 William Shakespeare offers sage advice: “Honesty is the best policy. If I lose mine honor, I lose myself.” Additional suggestions follow.

 – Love and accept yourself. Know what you want. Surround yourself with supportive people who accept you for who you really are.

Don’t compromise your integrity and reputation by associating with people whose standards of integrity you mistrust.

– Speak the truth. Communicate in an open and honest fashion. Exaggerating your ability to meet expectations will hurt your status and business more than being honest up front. Truth and trust go together. Lies erode others’ faith in you.

– Say what you mean and mean what you say. Present both sides of an issue to ensure objectivity. Simplify your statements so that others understand your message. Tell people the rational behind your decisions so that your intent is understood.

 – Keep promises. If there is a genuine reason you can’t reveal your position, such as when you’re negotiating, consider saying, “I can’t discuss that now.”

 Hold people accountable when their actions don’t match their words.. If you have a personal bias or a conflict of interest make it known to people with whom you are interacting.

 – Avoid compromising situations. If your boss tells you to lie about a given situation, gently decline saying you’re not comfortable with the idea, or offer an alternative way to achieve the goal.  If you find yourself in many compromising situations, think about moving on.

– Shift mindset. Lying is a learned survival strategy that can be unlearned. Note what triggers your decision to lie. What fear (e.g., being wrong, hurting someone) is behind this choice? Why do you believe the lie will have a better outcome, and for whom? Reflect on your answers to uncover your motivation, and make needed modifications.

When you sense yourself crafting a lie, ask yourself. “What’s the worst that can happen if I tell the truth?”

Visualize an image of your honest self. Focus on this image to maintain truthfulness in all situations.

 Additional tips for maintaining truthfulness and strengthening other Quester traits are discussed in award winning audiobook, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life by Dr. Carole Kanchier:

 https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

 Dr. Carole Kanchier, registered psychologist, career and personal growth expert, is author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Carole Kanchier inspires people to realize their potential and look at career advancement in new ways.  Dr. Kanchier pioneered the unique model of lifelong growth and decision making which she shares in “Questers Dare to Change.”  www.questersdaretochange.com.

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Audible, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, shows how to succeed by being yourself!

Are You A Quester?

Are you a Quester? Would you like to be one? Who are Questers anyway?

Questers redefine careers and work!  Questers are growth-oriented individuals with a sense of purpose, confidence, resilience, perseverance, and other traits needed to prevail in changing times.

Check your Quester traits: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

Questers shows how to realize potential!

https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts/

Best wishes in your life career,

Carole Kanchier, PhD

Author, Carole Kanchier is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach, speaker, and author of award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Contact Carole: carole@questersdaretochange.com

www.questersdaretochange.com

 

 

 

 

 

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Are You a Quester?

August 7, 2019

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Are you a Quester? Would you like to be one? Who are Questers anyway? What personality traits give them confidence and courage to succeed?

Questers are growth-oriented individuals with a sense of purpose, confidence, resilience, perseverance, and  will to risk. Questers redefine how we look at careers and work! Questers have qualities needed to succeed in changing times!

Check your Quester traits: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

The audible Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life is available:

https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Be all you were born to be. Audible Questers ashows how!

Author, Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach, and author of award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life. Dr. Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz and University of Alberta, and served as visiting scholar at institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Are You Telephone Savvy?

July 28, 2019

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Telephone Skills Are Crucial for Career Success

Are You Telephone Savvy? Part 1
The telephone is the most common business tool and its proper use is essential for career advancement.

Talking with a potential client, customer or colleague on the phone can sometimes be challenging. Without seeing an individual’s face, messages can become muddled and meanings misinterpreted.

Are you telephone savvy?

When you make calls do you

  1. State your message briefly and clearly?
  2. Leave your name, organization and phone number, repeating these twice, slowly and clearly?
  3. Give the full name of the person for whom you’re leaving the message?
  4. State the date and time of the call?
  5. State whether you’ll call back or you’d like the other person to calAsk for a return call at a time you’ll be available?
  6. When you receive calls, do you Identify yourself
  7. Use courtesies such as “Please hold while I complete another call.”
  8. Offer to take messages when you’re answering for someone?
  9. Repeat the caller’s name and number to make sure they’re correct?
  10. Speak in a professional manner?

Scoring: One point for each yes. The higher your score, the more positive telephone skills you possess. A score of 8 or less suggests you should enhance your skills.

Review telephone basics

  1. Knowledge: Before you make a call have the required information.
  2. Goals: Know what you want to accomplish.
  3. Attitude: Make the person feel you’re interested in him and the message.

– Make a great first impression. Show the caller you’re helpful, confident and competent. If a potential employer’s first contact is over the phone, she gets cues from your voice. What kind of impression are you giving?

Influence your listener’s reactions by controlling the pace, pitch, inflection and tone of your voice.  Strive for an energy level that matches your normal conversation. A soft voice suggests shyness or uncertainty; a loud voice implies anger or worry. Be alert to your caller’s needs. If he’s having trouble hearing, speak louder, more slowly.

Speak briskly but pronounce words clearly. When you talk too fast, you sound hurried or excited and are difficult to understand; when you too speak slowly, you sound tired, lazy or uninterested.

Inflection adds special meaning to your message. If, for example, you say, “John needs help with his resume this afternoon,” you’re suggesting John needs help. If you say, “John needs help with his resume — this afternoon, —  your indicating he needs help this afternoon.

Different tones of voice can make us feel differently — happy, angry, hurt, etc. Keep your tone attentive, interested and friendly. Smiling adds a pleasant tone to your voice.

– Be courteous, respectful. People are turned off by careless or rude remarks. Always say hello and identify yourself. Ask how you can help. Use courtesy words, “Thank you for waiting.”  If you need to put the caller on hold, ask, and wait for an answer. If you need to phone back, indicate when you’ll call.

End the call positively, for example, “Thanks for calling.”  Let the caller hang up first. This gives him control of the ending as well as an opportunity to ask further questions. Don’t eat, drink, or chew gum.

– Leave clear, concise messages. State your name and phone number. Repeat these twice. Give the name of the person you’re calling and date and time you called. If the person doesn’t return your call, phone again a few days later. For other message skills, review the telephone savvy questions.

If an employer calls, and you’re not prepared for the session, ask the employer if you can return the call, or if he can call back at a mutually convenient time. This gives you time to prepare.

Keep the forgoing in mind when you call or receive phone calls. Your confidence and career advancement will improve as you hone your phone skills.

Additional tips for strengthening telephone and other job skills are discussed in award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life: http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Darhange-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Visit Carole Kanchier’s blog for more tips to enhance personal and professional growth. www.questersdaretodhange.com/blog

Author bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach, speaker, and author of groundbreaking, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Dr. Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz and University of Alberta, and served as visiting fellow at Institute of Transpersonal Psychology, Palo Alto, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 

 

 

 

 

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What the Colors You Wear Say About You!

Colors you wear may affect your mood as well as how others perceive you. Work environment colors also matter.

At a subconscious level, colors affect people in different ways. Colors can send positive or negative messages. Using colors effectively to dress, decorate your office, or design your website can put you ahead of the competition.

Research on the psychology of color demonstrates that colors evoke emotional, behavioral and physical responses. Advertising executives know that a product can have a completely different impact if the packaging color is changed. Psychologists have found that certain colors in our environment help or hinder performance of certain tasks.

Generally, warm colors such as red and its neighboring hues on the color spectrum are active, exciting. Cool colors such as light green, blue and violet are passive, calming. Reds tend to stimulate the central nervous system and increase bodily tension, while cool colors release tension. Meanings change with lighter or darker shades of colors, and different cultures have differing views.

Research suggest that blue is the most favored color, followed by pink, green, red, purple and black. Brown is the least popular, followed by white, yellow and orange.

Personality traits are reflected by your preferred color. Extroverts like red, introverts blue. Yellow is the choice of intellectuals, and well-balanced individuals tend to wear green.

Use color positively

Use color to trigger desired emotions. Surround yourself with favorite colors to lift your spirit. In addition to selecting colors that suit you, attend to how you feel and the message you want to project.
When dressing for important meetings, plan your wardrobe to achieve impact. If you wear more than one color, combine the meanings to create your desired effect.  Remember to dress with authority. The dark suit, navy or medium to dark grey, with a crisp shirt and contrasting tie is appropriate for men.
 
Red exudes power, energy, excitement and passion. It makes peoples’ hearts beat faster. Wear red when you want to be assertive, need an energy boost or exude sexuality. Red is effective as an accessory to project energy. Avoid red when you feel nervous, want to elude attention.

Orange represents creativity, confidence, joy, sensuality and ambition. It suggests vibrant health and has positive effects on emotional states. Wear orange when you want to have fun, heighten creativity or heal emotions. Avoid it when you feel restless, dependent, fearful, want to relax.

Yellow is associated with happiness, freedom, optimism and mental concentration. Yellow speeds metabolism. Some shades suggest cowardice; golden shades promise good times. Wear yellow when you need to attend to details, maintain mental alertness, feel happy. Use sparingly because it can be overpowering. Avoid yellow when you’re fearful, want to evade attention, relax.

Green suggests security, abundance, love, growth, luck and balance. It’s also associated with envy. Forest green projects conservatism, wealth, but olive green may represent illness. Wear green when you want to see things from a different perspective, need to feel grounded, calm, generous. Don’t wear it when you’re confused, feel stagnant, want to be alone.

Blue represents authority, structure, communication, dependability, trust and loyalty. Some shades or too much blue can project coldness. Wear blue when you want to exude power, have mental control, be conservative, respected or communicate an important message. Don’t wear blue when you feel isolated, depressed, critical.

Grey is practical, timeless, cautious, successful and solid. Some shades are associated with age, depression, lack of direction. Excessive use of gray leads to feelings of being invisible, but a touch adds feelings of stability. Wear grey when you want to feel self-sufficient, isolate yourself. Avoid it when you feel lonely, stressed.

Brown is associated with stability, honesty, practicality and commitment. Wear brown when you need to work hard, be a team member or organized. Avoid it when you want to expend energy, play, feel insecure.

Pink represents love, affection and serenity. Wear it when you want to feel feminine, lovable, need to concentrate and listen. Avoid pink when you feel vulnerable, insecure, fragmented, are giving more than receiving.

Purple is associated with prosperity, spirituality and sophistication. Wear purple to project wisdom, trust, release destructive emotions. Don’t wear it when you want to evade societal regulations.

Black represents power, elegance, discipline and mystery. Sometimes, it’s associated with evil and grieving.
Wear black to communicate an authoritative image or protect emotions. Since too much black can overwhelm some, don’t wear it when you want to establish rapport.

White symbolizes purity, cleanliness, safety, completion, strength and neutrality. Wear white to feel peaceful, convey a well-balanced, optimistic personality. White is most effective as part of an ensemble. Too much can project coldness, isolation.

Make a great impression. Use color to create your desired effect at business and other meetings. 

Additional tips for growing your life career are found in award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963.The  Dr. Carole Kanchier is a registered psychologist, coach, and newspaper/digital columnist, Carole Kanchier is available for keynotes and consultations: www.questersdaretochange.com.

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Summer Solstice - Put Fresh Life Into Your Job Search

 

Friday, June 21, 2019, was the Summer Solstice in the northern hemisphere. It was the longest day and the shortest night of the year, and the beginning of summer. The summer solstice is honored in several cultures as the union between heaven and earth. As we emerge out of spring, where we were in a period of renewal, birthing new ideas, and shedding icy layers, we slowly grow into summer, a time of manifestation and ripening of fruit. Summer is an ideal time to set intentions and state goals for the rest of the year. Below are suggestions for starting the summer off right.

– Unleash your spirit. The summer solstice enables us to take advantage of the light that can help us release burdens, doubts, and fears, so we can become open to new opportunities. Enjoy and bask in the sun. Connect with your inner child, and take time to play.

Listen to your inner self. Pay attention to your dreams, sorrows and beliefs.  Reflect on ideas that have been sizzling in your mind since spring. Ask yourself, “What progress have I made in the past year?” “What do I want to accomplish within the next year?” “What goals do I want to attain before the end of the year?” What can I do to attain these goals?” What people, resources, skills, and other do I need to attain my goals?”

Make friends with your inner child. List things parents warned you about. Examine attitudes and beliefs you developed as a result of these teachings. Do admonitions like “Never question authority,” “Boys don’t cry,” apply today? Examining long-held beliefs opens you up to new ways of seeing things.

Rise early. Watching the sun rise is a powerful reminder of nature’s cycles we often take for granted. Wake up with the sun. Watch it rise. When the sun is low in the sky, you can stare into it, fill your eyes and body with light.

Restructure work time. List your job energizes and stressors. Concentrate on the positive responsibilities, and intersperse negative activities with short breaks and rewards. Avoid unnecessary meetings and delegate.

Develop a positive outlook. See the glass half full instead of half empty. Reinforce the positive in yourself and others. Most of all, develop a sense of humor and learn to laugh at yourself. Smell the roses. Enjoy small pleasures such as walking in the park or watching toddlers play.

Be active. The ancient Greeks and Romans saw real meaning in the summer solstice. Many festivals were held at this time. An important festival was the run-up to the Olympic games. The summer solstice marked the one-month count down to the athletic games. Start your new exercise regime during this summer solstice.

Spring clean. For the ancient Romans, the summer solstice was time to celebrate the home and family. Use this summer solstice time to care for home and work chores like cleaning your work office or home attic.

Plant a tree. For the ancient Chinese, the summer solstice was a time to celebrate the earth by giving back to it. Plant a tree in your backyard or a local park. Help clean up a public place or work with your neighbors to sweep trash off the streets.

Have a bonfire, but ensure the fire is out before retiring for the night. Sitting around the bonfire and talking with friends, co-workers and family, may be the quintessential summer activity. It’s also what the ancient Vikings of Scandinavia did to celebrate the summer solstice.

Plan a trip. The longer and warmer summer days allow travelers more time to see sights and explore cultural and geographic destinations. For example, Stonehenge in England, built by the Druids thousands of years ago, gathered at this remarkable landmark to mark the summer solstice.

Express gratitude. Remind yourself of what you are grateful for. When you focus on what you have, rather than what you lack, you emanate the energy of abundance. And the truth is we all have something to be grateful for!

Find something stimulating in each day. Seek challenges at work or in leisure activities. Respect yourself. Engage in positive self-talk. Tell yourself, “I’m OK just as I am,” or “I’m human and I’ll make mistakes.” Reward yourself. Realize that you don’t always have to prove anything or excel over others.

Draw or doodle. Write a question that clearly states what you want to know. Underneath it, draw whatever flows though your hands. Use your intuitive skills to interpret the meaning and symbols in the drawing.  Note the sequence of steps and your thoughts and feelings as you study the drawing.

Play mental games like “what if….” These require a willingness to think freely, so don’t close doors on ideas. Resist thinking, “Don’t be silly!” or “That’s stupid.” Lose yourself in enjoyable activities daily. Exercise, sew, paint, sing, dance, write, start a scrapbook or photo album.

Make something for yourself. Creativity feeds the soul and focuses the mind. Pick something you’ve always wanted to learn how to make. Soap! Beer! Bread! Jewelry! Leather stamping! Painting! Knitting! Go to your local craft or hardware store, or checkout YouTube and find something you’d like to learn how to do and do it!

Make something for co-workers. Cut that soap up and wrap the bars individually in something you’ve designed. You can design a label for that microbrew you made and give a bottle to coworkers! Getting something homemade means more to many.

Host a potluck for co-workers. It’s a wonderful time to reach out to people you’d like to get to know better. You’d be surprised how much fun you’ll have and how many work colleagues you will know better.

Limit time you spend on social media. Social networks can be great for connecting but they can also sometimes skew how we perceive ourselves and other people. We can be fooled into feeling as if everyone else’s lives are so much better than our own, but they’re not really. Most of us try to show our best selves on social networks and we should. But there are times when it’s better just to turn it off.

Strengthen at least one Quester trait to add spice to life. Tips for developing Quester skills like confidence, purpose, creativity, and resilience are found in Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life: http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Author bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is a registered psychologist, coach, internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, and author of award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life. Carole Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz and University of Alberta, and served as visiting fellow at Institute of Transpersonal Psychology, Palo Alto, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential. Contact: carole@daretochange.com

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