Give the Gift of Forgiveness

February 27, 2020

© Carole Kanchier, PhD

Forgiveness is a gift that costs nothing, means everything and is also a key to good health.

Forgiveness is freeing up and putting to better use the energy once consumed by holding grudges, harboring resentments, and nursing unhealed wounds. It’s a time to rediscover our strengths and our capacity to understand and accept other people and ourselves.

If we can forgive those who have hurt us, we will rise to higher levels well-being. Recent studies show that people who are taught to forgive become “less angry, more hopeful, less depressed, less anxious and less stressed,” which leads to greater physical and mental well-being.

A study at University of California, San Diego, found that participants who thought about a hurtful event, experienced lingering blood pressure spikes that—if repeated over time—could lead to heart attacks or strokes.

Psychologists define forgiveness

Psychologists generally define forgiveness as a conscious, deliberate decision to release feelings of resentment or vengeance toward a person or group who has harmed one, regardless of whether they actually deserve one’s forgiveness.

Just as important as defining what forgiveness is, though, is understanding what forgiveness is not.  Forgiveness does not mean forgetting, nor does it mean condoning or excusing offenses. Though forgiveness can help repair a damaged relationship, it doesn’t obligate one to reconcile with the person who harmed the individual, or release that person from legal accountability. Instead, forgiveness brings the forgiver peace of mind and frees him or her from destructive anger.

Fostering forgiveness at work

Unresolved stress from interpersonal conflict often dampens our cognitive and compassionate capacities, making it hard to find a way to forgive. Experts who study forgiveness in the work place offer suggestions to foster forgiveness:

– Model forgiveness, particularly if you’re a leader. Leaders’ behavior often has the greatest impact on organizational culture. Leaders who model forgiveness on a regular basis are cueing similar behavior in others.

– Express gratitude. Frequent and sincere expressions of appreciation have been found to produce dramatic effects on individuals and organizations. Gratitude can be expressed by encouraging employees to keep a gratitude journal to track three things they’re grateful for each night, writing a thank you card, or emailing someone each day to express appreciation for his or her contributions. Gratitude requires neither big budgets nor heavy time commitments.

For example, several years ago the CEO of LG in Japan set himself the challenge of writing five gratitude cards expressing his appreciation and thanks to five different people in his organization for the contributions they made, each day. More than six years later not only has he maintained this commitment but he credits it with having changed his whole organization because it made him look for things he wouldn’t normally see and to help people flourish who would have been previously ignored

– Take responsibility for mistakes. Apologize and attempt to make restitutions. If we don’t take responsibility for our mistakes, distrust grows and the fear of something happening again can be worse than the original incident.

– Rebuild trust by working on a common task. This creates new experiences and memories of cooperation.

– Don’t tell others what to do.  Listen, rather than expound. Develop tolerance for contrary opinions. When someone offers us their viewpoint, we should try to respond with: “I’ve never considered that before—thank you. I’ll give it some thought.”

– Let go of resentments. Resentments thrive because we are unwilling to end that altercation with an offer of kindness and forgiveness.

– Depersonalize perceived negative comments, and respond with kiondness. Send the higher, faster energies of peace, joy and forgiveness as responses to whatever comes our way.

– Live in the present. Enjoy good things about the present moment, rather than being consumed with anger over the past or worry about the future.

– Don’t judge. Try to understand where the person may be coming from. Rephrase critical internal thoughts int positive ones, or at least a neutral ones. After all, we really don’t know the reasons for someone’s behavior.

– Participate in staff development programs to address conflict and foster forgiveness. Invest in programs that  develop understanding and teach evidence-based tools for ongoing workplace forgiveness.

The 7 ed. of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Dr. Carole Kanchier, provides additional information on fostering forgiveness and enhancing other aspects of our work and home environments. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible book: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential. Dr. Kanchier is available consultations, keynotes, and coaching.

Contact; Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

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Spring, a time for renewal and rebirth, is here.  Our emotions are lifted. We become open to change.

Spring is a great time to re-examine life career goals, and renew commitments or explore other compatible options.

Based on ongoing research, the 7 ed. of award-winning, Questers Dare to Change redefines life career advancement, and shows how to navigate lifelong career decision making.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Case studies of purposeful, growth oriented, Questers, quizzes, and guidelines show readers how to empower themselves to manage lifelong personal, career, and spiritual growth.

Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts/ and Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Individuals and organizations world wide benefit from Questers.  Questers Dare to Change answers many questions adults have about lifelong decision making and growth.

* Are you a Quester? Check Quester traits with self-scoring quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

* Courage – A crucial skill in changing times

* Develop a lifelong master plan for career success

* Develop a winning mindset

* Understand how job dissatisfaction affects health and productivity

* Are you ready for a career shift?

* Overcome fear of failure

* Entry, mastery, and disengagement – Where are you?

* Find your truth – Complete self-scoring quizzes

… And so much mo

I will be delighted to send a complementary PDF version of Questers for review, and be available for a consultation or speaking engagement at your request. Sample articles/columns are on my web site: www.questersdaretochange.com/blog.

Many thanks for sharing lifelong life career decision making.

Carole Kanchier, PhD; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

 Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 

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Authenticity – Be Yourself

February 21, 2020

Carole Kanchier, PhD

Authenticity – Be Yourself

Questers Dare to Change Shows How

                https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

The word, “authenticity” comes from the Greek root authentikos, meaning “original, genuine, principal.” Authentic people are genuine, self actualizing and have a sense of purpose. Along with fearless passion and courage, they possess strong mental discipline.

Authenticity does not come from title, social stature, or wealth, but rather from how we live. That is, how we go about pursuing our purpose and making a contribution in our own unique way. Authentic people prevail in changing times because they are in harmony with the energy of the universe. Most Questers, described in Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, are authentic: www.questersdaretochange.com.

How authentic are you?

  • Check qualities you possess.
  • – Try to perform daily activities in unique ways
  • – Work hard
  • – Share honest opinions
  • – Enjoy being alone
  • – Self aware
  • – Curiou
  • – Love intellectual stimulation
  • – Respect others
  • – Enjoy inter personal relationships
  • – Seek new opportunities
  • – Exude vibrancy
  • – Care about environmental issues
  • – Live in the moment
  • Scoring: The more statements you checked, the more authentic you seem to be.

Fostering authenticity

To be authentic, you must understand who you are, who you want to become, and contributions you intend to make to make the world a better place.  Be self-guided, real!.

– Strengthen Quester traits. Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

– Build self esteem. Confidence gives you courage to set high expectations, to risk, to grow, to be authentic. Acknowledge your accomplishments. Prepare a list of positive achievements and personality characteristics. Post this where you can read it daily. Don’t change to please others or compare yourself to or compete with others.

Stretch yourself. Constantly push the envelope, raising standards. Challenge conventional beliefs and paths. Travel uncharted territories. Although this may invoke disappointments, accepting and growing through challenges enhances authenticity.

– Be in the moment. Engage yourself completely in the activity at hand.

– Maintain perspective. Time and distance can make mountains seem like molehills. Don’t let what happened yesterday affect what will happen tomorrow. Face each challenge with an open mind.  Look upon setbacks as one step toward growth and authenticity.

Take comfort in uncertainty.  This unchartered path evolves moment-by-moment.  Realize the path is the goal. Everything is workable.

– Focus on the positive. Look for and expect good things. Each time you catch yourself thinking something negative, replace it with a more positive thought.

– Strengthen resilience. Note what you’ve learned from traumatic experiences. Indicate how these have made you stronger, wiser, more authentic. Identify early cues that you’ve ignored, and what you’d now do differently.

– Bolster courage to risk. Review three successful risks taken. Note what made these successful. Identify perceived barriers for taking another risk, and explore ways to overcome them.

– Manage fear. Identify worrisome issues. Minimize these by researching relevant information and resources. Live in the present. Let go of “attachments.”

– Create a life in which you continue to grow and have choices. Make choices in harmony with your authentic self.  Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life shows how. http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Dr. Carole Kanchier, career and personal growth expert, is a registered psychologist, coach, speaker and author of  award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Dr. Kanchier offers coaching and speaking engagements on topics related to being the real you.

Contact  Carole Kanchier; carole@daretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

 

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SPRING – NEW CAREER BEGINNINGS

Questers Dare to Change Shows How to Revitalise Career

Spring is a time for renewal and rebirth and the signs of change are all around us. Flowers are blooming, the days are longer, brighter, warmer. We become more open to inviting changes into our lives.

Spring, a season of transformations, may be the time to dare yourself to make desired changes in your life career!

Based on ongoing research, the 7 edition of award winning, Questers Dare to Change, redefines career advancement and shows how to navigate lifelong career decisions.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Case studies of purposeful, growth oriented, Questers, quizzes, and guidelines show readers how to empower themselves to manage lifelong personal, career, and spiritual growth.

Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts/ and Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Individuals and organizations world wide benefit from Questers.  Questers Dare to Change answers many questions people have about lifelong decision making and growth.

* Are you a Quester? Check Quester traits with self-scoring quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

* Courage – A crucial skill in changing times

* Develop a lifelong master plan for career success

* Develop a winning mindset

* Understand how job dissatisfaction affects health and productivity

* Are you ready for a career shift?

* Overcome fear of failure

* Entry, mastery, and disengagement – Where are you?

* Find your truth – Complete self-scoring quizzes

… And so much more

Please request a complementary PDF version of Questers for review. Dr. Kanchier is available for consultations or speaking engagements. Sample articles/columns may be found: www.questersdaretochange.com/blog.

Many thanks for considering this invitation to share ongoing personal, career and spiritual growth.

Carole Kanchier, PhD carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and consulted with organizations world wide. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 Tips for Energizing Career

February 18, 2020

3 Tips for Energizing Career

Srengthen Quester traits. Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

– Overcome fear of failure. Attend to self talk. Keep log of negative things you say to self, say cancel, replace with positive thought.

– Explore desired career options within or outside your current organization then update skills to apply for job.

Review award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life, by Carole Kanchier, to get additional tips for energizing career and managing lifelong career decision making. https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

 

 

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EMBRACE CHANGE

February 18, 2020

EMBRACE #CHANGE

#QuestersDaretoChange Shows How

Spring is here, and many are re-examining life career goals.

Based on ongoing research, the 7 edition of award winning, Questers Dare to Change, redefines career advancement and shows how to navigate lifelong career decisions.

Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life

https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Case studies of purposeful, growth oriented, Questers, quizzes, and guidelines show readers how to empower themselves to manage lifelong personal, career, and spiritual growth.

Take the Quester Quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz

Check audible Questers: https://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Please review sample book chapters: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/book/excerpts/ and Carole’s blogs: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/blog

Individuals and organizations world wide benefit from Questers.  Questers Dare to Change answers many questions adults have about lifelong decision making and growth.

* Are you a Quester? Check Quester traits with self-scoring quiz: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/

* Courage – A crucial skill in changing times

* Develop a lifelong master plan for career success

* Develop a winning mindset

* Understand how job dissatisfaction affects health and productivity

* Are you ready for a career shift?

* Overcome fear of failure

* Entry, mastery, and disengagement – Where are you?

* Find your truth – Complete self-scoring quizzes

… And so much more

Would you and your team ike to share topics addressed in Questers? I will be delighted to send a complementary PDF version of Questers for review, and be available for a consultation or speaking engagement at your request. Sample articles/columns are on my web site: www.questersdaretochange.com/blog.

Many thanks for sharing this invitation to help others change their life careers for the better.

Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and consulted with organizations world wide. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

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QUESTERS DARE TO CHANGE YOUR JOB AND LIFE by Carole Kanchier, PhD

 Informative, Thought-Provoking Interview Questions

  • Who are “Questers?” What are their characteristics? How can people find out if they have a “Q” type personality?
  • Check your Quester traits: http://www.questersdaretochange.com/services-2/quester-quiz/
  • What can people do to develop Quester traits?
  • How does “the seven year itch” apply to career transitions – voluntary and involuntary?
  • How can a person turn a job loss into a victory? Survive in the current job market?
  • Many people are holding on to jobs they dislike/ Is this wise ?CCCC
  • How can people stay optimistic during job search? Is it realistic to dream big?
  • How can adults find work that matters to them and gives them a sense of meaning, purpose and direction?
  • Why did you write Dare to Change
  • You tell some very interesting stories about people who have made daring or unconventional career changes. Tell us about some.
  • You have an interesting chart of old and new career attitudes. Please share some old and new views.
  • What are some career transition Do’s and Don’ts?
  • Is it too late for a person of about 55 to change jobs or return to school?
  • What are some great strategies for landing a job?
  • What about people who want to change their lives but are afraid? How can they overcome the fear?
  • Can people who are not by nature risk-takers develop the will to risk?
  • What factors should people consider when making career decisions?
  • How can people tell if they’re ready for a career change?
  • What can a person do to present a dynamic image?
  • How can a job searcher stay motivated after getting numerous job rejections?
  • What does “retirement” mean to you?
  • What are some common excuses people make for not following their dreams?
  • How can people use intuition for career decision making or job search?

 

Contact: Carole Kanchier

www.questersdaretochange.com

carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What’s Your Purpose – Your Raison D’etre?

 Efforts and courage are not enough without purpose and direction.” ―John F. Kennedy

Having a sense of purpose and striving towards goals that enable you to express your purpose gives life meaning, direction and satisfaction. It not only contributes to health and longevity, but also enables you to succeed in uncertain times. If you’re in harmony with your purpose, you’re also in sync with the energy of the universe.

 Do you know your purpose?

Answer yes or no:

  1. Facing my daily tasks is very satisfying.
  2. I have clear career and life goals.
  3. My life has been worthless.
  4. I enjoy my close friends.
  5. I wouldn’t change my life drastically if I had six months to live.
  6. I have seriously thought of suicide.
  7. I see a reason to be here.
  8. My job and other activities give my life meaning.
  9. I have little meaning in my life.
  10. I spend my life doing what I “should” rather than what I want.
  11. My job reflects my purpose.
  12. I can state my purpose in a sentence.

Scoring: One for each “no” to statements 3, 6, 9 and 10; and one for each “yes” to others. The higher you score, the more involved you are in activities that give you a sense of meaning, direction and happiness. You’re honest with yourself, enjoy life, and are probably achieving desired goals. Your various work, leisure and other activities reflect a unity of purpose.

 Clarifying purpose

Identifying your purpose will take time particularly if you’re not used to looking inward.

– Identify what’s important to you. Clarify what success means to you. Don’t try to live up to others’ expectations and definitions of success.

– Consider how you’d change your life if you knew you had six months to live. If you would change jobs, return to school, complete a project, travel, then get on with it! What’s stopping you? Be honest.

– State what you’d do if you had billions. If you’re working at something that has no meaning just to pay bills, you’re making money more important than your sense of purpose. How could you make money doing what you really enjoy? Ross, a former accountant, earns lot of money making and selling his pottery.

–  Identify personality traits you would choose if you could begin life today. Would you be more assertive, caring or other?

– Describe yourself without using labels. Specify human qualities, for example: “I am smart, creative, and a loving partner.” If you resort to labels such as job history or marital status, you may view yourself as a statistic rather than a special human being.

– Adopt a cause. Discover ways in which you can get involved in community or other projects in which you believe — that enable you to express your purpose. Volunteer to help in a senior citizens’ home, volunteer to be big sister or bother, join a community fire fighting or group that fights for a cause in which you believe.

–  Identify major themes or patterns: 1) Proud accomplishments in any life area (social, work, school, civic); 2) What you want colleagues to say about you; 3) Absorbing childhood activities; 4) Recurring dream; 5) What you’d do if you couldn’t fail; 6) A prize you’d select (literary, athletic) for being the world’s best; 7) What you’d wear to a costume party; 8) People you admire and why; 9) Skills you want to use in your ideal job.

Write a “working” mission statement describing your purpose based on recurring themes. Discuss your themes with a partner. Brainstorm how your purpose can be expressed in various life components. For example, if your purpose is to help others, you could express it at work by being a helpful sales clerk. In family activities, you may express your purpose by being a loving aunt. Don’t allow age, lack of education, or physical disability stop you from expressing your purpose.

Dick’s purpose is communications. He’s been a successful magazine editor, author, broadcaster, photographer and evangelist. Charlene’s purpose is caring for animals. She’s made this into her business — caring for pets during their families’ vacations and waking dogs.

 Barbara loves woodworking and cabinet making so she developed a business that enables her to offer these services to her community. Roy‘s purpose is helping people. He says, “Volunteers are unpaid not because they are worthless, but because they are priceless.” Roy volunteers for varied projects that help needy children.

Purpose is a common denominator for success. Knowing your purpose will give you courage to do what you’ve always longed to do. It will be easier to risk, to manage fear. You’ll be able to change your life for the better.

But before pursuing a job that will enable you to express your purpose, research options. Then clarify a job goal that will enable you to express your purpose, and develop a plan to attain your goal. Be flexible as your goals may change as you get to know yourself and options better.

Singleness of purpose is one of the chief essentials for success in life, no matter what may be one’s aim.”John D. Rockefeller

TAG: Dr. Carole Kanchier pioneered the concept of purpose in her work on lifelong career, personal, and spiritual growth. A registered psychologist, coach, educator and syndicated print/digital columnist, Carole is author of the award-winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Your Life: http://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963    

 Dr. Kanchier offers workshops, keynotes and individual coaching to help individuals and organizations clarify and express their purpose: carole@questersdaretochange.com

 

 

 

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Age-30 Transition and the Developing 30s

 Do you feel confused, sluggish, and dissatisfied? Does the desire to try new things take precedence over safety needs? Are you between18 to 34?

If so, you may be experiencing the Age-30 Transition. My research described in award winning Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life redefines life career advancement, and shows how to navigate lifelong career decision making https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

During the Age-30 Transition, many realize they have ignored important needs and interests. Now, new choices must be made and commitments altered or deepened.

At a recent book signing, Rick, 28, a computer engineer shared his story. He chose the computer field because the “money was good.” Now he “wants to do and be something more!” He feels that his life no longer has meaning.

Rick is also discovering a change in how he looks at time. He is aware that life is finite. Death is still just an abstract concept. New experiences are waiting! Rick decided to enter police training/

Women face an even more turbulent time than men during this transition. The “biological clock” increases pressures they face about when and if they want a family. Beverly, a music teacher in her 20s, decided to take time off at 31 to have a child and teach piano at home for the next few years.

During reappraisal at this time, many young adults shift values, priorities, and goals. They become more self-aware, and place higher value on quality of life. Job satisfaction becomes more important than climbing the ladder or higher wages.

Are you experiencing this Age-30 Transition or the Age-30 Developmental Period?

If so, refer to Questers Dare to Change for suggestions on moving forward.

Carole Kanchier, PhD

carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

3 Tips for Creating Good Work Habits

  1. Present a professional, confident image. Consider others’ feelings. Be respectful and considerate to everyone. Practice such basic courtesies as returning messages promptly, leaving concise voice mail messages, sending hand written thank you notes and greeting people when entering an office.
  2. Value others’ opinions. Listen when they speak. Offer your opinion after people have spoken. Ask questions when you’re not clear about something. Summarize what you hear people say to correct misunderstandings. Let others know you hear what they’re feeling but not saying
  1. Let others know you appreciate their efforts or accomplishmnts. Feedback and praise are most effective when offered immediately and linked to specific activities, products or attributes.

Review the many suggestions offered in award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life which redefines lifelong career decisions making. Paperback edition: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with clients representing many disciplines. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com

 

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© Carole Kanchier, PhD

How to Create Good Work Habits

Are your work habits holding you back? Are you aware of your bad habits? Are you settling for less than your best?

Habits are acquired behavior patterns regularly followed until they become involuntary. You may not be aware of some habits because they’re made without thinking. However, superiors and clients will catch them.

Spring is perfect time to make changes that will advance your career. Here are common bad habits and tips on how to eliminate them.

Create good habits from bad habits

– Bad habit – Abusing time  

Good habit:  Manage time. Get up an hour earlier to think and plan. Review daily work activities to identify self-defeating habits such as underestimating time needed for tasks. Make a to-do list and prioritize tasks. Don’t try to do too much at once. Break big jobs into smaller, manageable tasks. Allow for the unexpected. Consult your schedule often and re-prioritize tasks as necessary to ensure you deliver on commitments.

– Bad habit – Fearing failure

Good habit: View mistakes as opportunities. Failure is a powerful teacher. Learn the lesson.  Ask yourself: “Why did the mistake occur?”What elements were responsible?” “How can I avoid similar mistakes in the future?” If you make the same mistake twice, put the lesson in writing. Place the questions and answers where you’ll be reminded not to repeat steps which led to the error.  Measure success by how quickly you recover from mistakes. If you accept setbacks, you’ll continue to grow.

Bad habit –  Criticizing co-workers

Good habit:: When you give colleagues feedback, be constructive. Offer suggestions. Don’t hover or nitpick. Resist the urge to offer advice on non-essential matters.

– Bad habit – Staying in a rut

Good habit:  Reevaluate your career goals and progress. Can your current position help you attain desired goals? If not, think of other more satisfying possibilities. Explore options in your company and field as well as different fields. Consider moving down the corporate ladder. Explore lateral positions or creatively redesign your job. Think about self employment, relocating and retraining. Devise a plan for attaining your goal.

– Bad habit – Adhering to old notions of career advancement

Good habit:: Reevaluate your definition of career development. View career growth as a lifelong process of personal and professional development — a continuing quest to maintain harmony between who you are and what you do.  Select an occupation that is congruent with your personal qualities rather than to please others or for the myth of security.

Bad habit –  Failing to maintain a healthy lifestyle

Good habit:: Find time for yourself. Work is just one component of a happy and productive life. Identify activities that would bring peace and satisfaction to your life (relationship, hobby, spiritual practices or volunteer activity). Reward your successes.

– Bad habit – Using company computer for personal matters
Good habit:  Work on personal projects at home or during the lunch hour. Focus on tasks for which you get paid during business hours.

– Bad habit – Sending useless e-mails

Good habit:: Send relevant information only and ensure that the message content is clear. Verify each message answers the “5 Ws” (who, what, when, where, why).

– Bad habit – Practicing poor business etiquette

Good habit: Present a professional, confident image. Consider others’ feelings. Be respectful and considerate to everyone. Practice such basic courtesies as returning messages promptly, leaving concise voice mail messages, sending hand written thank you notes and greeting people when entering an office.

– Bad habit – Interrupting others

Good habit:: Value others’ opinions. Listen when they speak. Offer your opinion after people have spoken. Ask questions when you’re not clear about something. Summarize what you hear people say to correct misunderstandings. Let others know you hear what they’re feeling but not saying.

– Bad habit – Failing to give feedback and recognition

Good habit:: Let others know you appreciate their efforts or accomplishments. Feedback and praise are most effective when offered immediately and linked to specific activities, products or attributes.

– Bad habit – Abusing company expense accounts
Good habit:  Apply the same smart frugality that you use in your personal life to business expenses.  Save the company money and you will be recognized for it.

– Bad habit – Being impatient with clients

Good habit:: Value customer service. List reasons why customers are important to the business. Take a refresher course in customer service offered by your company or local college.

– Bad habit – Stealing company products

Good habit:: Don’t take products such as office supplies that belong to the organization for business uses. It’s unlawful, and can cost your professional reputation.

Recognize and break poor habits

List habits that are hampering your career advancement. Ask superiors and colleagues for feedback. (Examples include: not following through on promises, not meeting deadlines, not being a team member, not being flexible, not managing conflict, and sharing personal information.

Each week, replace a bad habit with a more productive behavior. Describe how the good habit will advance your career. Observe successful people. Read. With practice, each new activity will become easier, more automatic. Stay positive, focused. Persist.

Review the many suggestions offered in award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life which redefines lifelong career decisions making. Paperback edition: https://www.amazon.com/Questers-Dare-Change-Your-Life/dp/1508408963

Check audible edition: htps://www.audible.com/pd/Questers-Dare-to-Change-Your-Job-and-Life-Audiobook/B07VZNKGJF?asin=B07VZNKGJF&ipRedirectOverride=true&overrideBaseCountry=true&pf_rd_p=34883c04-32e5-4474-a65d-0ba68f4635d3&pf_rd_r=TN801GRP49AWQSSYMDYC1

Author Bio: Carole Kanchier, PhD, is an internationally recognized newspaper/digital columnist, registered psychologist, coach and author of award winning, Questers Dare to Change Your Job and Life.  Kanchier has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Santa Cruz, University of Alberta, and other institutions of higher learning, and worked with clients representing many disciplines. Dr. Kanchier is known for her pioneering, interdisciplinary approach to human potential.

Contact: carole@daretochange.com; carole@questersdaretochange.com; www.questersdaretochange.com